F2

1st AD Protocol (Cheat Sheet)

This is a streamlined “cheat sheet” for seasoned 1st ADs. Twirl open any callout and the complete description of that step will be displayed. Please remember that all GREEN CALLS are made over the radio and are repeated by the 2nd AD, while all BLUE CALLS are made to on-set crew only and are not repeated by the 2nd AD.

Daily Protocol

Morning Meeting

We are having the morning meeting
  • Precisely at call time, the 1D gathers the crew by the trucks for the morning meeting. The 1D goes over the logistics of the day and addresses safety concerns.
  • COVID: Due to the congregation of all crew members, the morning meeting should ideally be performed outside. If the space does not permit all crew to congregate with physical distancing, the crew should be divided into smaller groups and the meeting should be repeated for each group.
Work safely, everyone
  • This concludes the morning meeting. 1D then gathers DR, DP, SS, 2C, and goes to set.

WORKING OUT THE BLOCKING

Clear the set for blocking
  • If DR is ready, the 1D asks 2D to escort the actors to set, so that DR and actors can work out the blocking. During this time, 1D manages crew staging, while periodically monitoring DR.
Are we ready to mark the blocking?
  • If DR is ready, 1D invites DP, SS, and 2C to set and oversees the determination of coverage.

WORKING OUT THE COVERAGE

Observe the crew working out the coverage
  • DR and DP watch the action that’s been worked out with the actors. Together they discuss any changes. 1D watches and checks that: DP watches the coverage through a viewfinder or lens; SS watches eyelines and notes coverage plan; 2C marks the actors’ stopped positions with colored tape.
  • COVID: Physical distancing must be maintained during the laying down of marks. Either the actors should step back while the 2C lays down the mark, or the actor should be provided tape to lay down their own mark.
Are we ready for the New Deal?
  • Only when the plan is agreed upon, 1D calls:

NEW DEAL

We have a New Deal
  • 1D confirms all department heads are present. DR shows the action.
  • COVID: If physical distancing is not possible due to space limitations, the New Deal should be repeated for smaller clusters of department heads.
Questions on the blocking?
  • DR fields queries, then shows/explains coverage.
Questions on the coverage?
  • DR fields questions on the plan. 1D facilitates, making sure every department is anticipating issues.
Is the plan good?

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

BUILDING IT

OK, let's build it. Thank you, First Team.
  • 2D escorts First Team (DR and actors) to base camp. 1D quietly gets a setup time estimate from the DP. (Note: No one else but 1D and DR need ask about time or guess how long things will take.) From this point on, 1D is quietly monitoring progress and updating department time estimates.
  • Ways of being helpful throughout this process include: “Let’s get the frame” … “Let’s get focus” … “Let’s get a boom line” … “Work quietly”
  • COVID: Crew must maintain physical distancing at all times, except for where a technical operation makes it impossible. Such moments should be kept to a bare minimum and undertaken with extreme caution. If the space does not permit crew members to maintain physical distancing, 1D must organize the staggering and rotation of different departments’ work. This is something that should have been identified during the tech scout, so a plan should already have been discussed for this in advance of the production day.
  • COVID: Camera placement should be more than six feet away from any actor. Any exceptions to this need to have been approved during Director’s Prep.
  • COVID: Set up video village in a location to minimize crowding around the monitor. Only two, physically distancing crew members may be at video village at one time, with priority given to DR and SS.
  • COVID: SM gives a sanitized wireless lav to each actor and instructs them how to secure the mic. If necessary, SM may secure the mic themselves, but the physical proximity should be kept to a minimum duration and an extra level of protection should be considered, such as a face-shield or a plexiglass divider.
Are we ready for camera rehearsal?

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Camera Rehearsal

Camera rehearsal is up. Stand by.
  • 2D asks DR if they wish to be present. DR either comes to set or 2D informs 1D to proceed without DR. (If DR does not come to set, 1D calls “action” and “cut” instead.)
  • COVID: Do not use actors for the camera rehearsal, and keep minimal crew on set.
Camera ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
We are going for camera rehearsal...
  • Action is called. Technical team runs shot.
...That's a cut on camera rehearsal
How was that for camera?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
How was that for sound?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

BAD FOR EITHER
Troubleshoot

GOOD FOR BOTH
Proceed

Camera ready for rehearsal?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready for rehearsal?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Rehearsal

Essential personnel only, please.
  • COVID: The set is about to become a Zone A space, so 1D clears the set of all non-essential personnel.
First Team in, please
  • 2D brings DR and actors to set. Everything must be ready!
Everyone work quietly. First team is on set.
  • DR works with actors. (Note: Rehearsal moves directly into shooting. If any technical issue arise that cannot be solved immediately, 1D releases First Team until it is solved.)
  • COVID: Actors should ideally remain in masks during rehearsals. If masks need to be removed for any reason, consider deploying other protections, such as plexiglass barriers.
Rehearsal is up. Stand by.
  • 1D waits and confirms visually when DR is ready.
Quiet, please. We are going for rehearsal...
  • DR calls “action” and “cut.” This should be treated like it is a take by all set personnel. Make sure the set is locked up.
...That's a cut on rehearsal. Stand by.
  • While DR checks in with the actors, 1D checks in with camera and sound for feedback. 1D relays this information to DR, who chooses to rehearse again or proceed. Are we ready to shoot?
Are we ready to shoot?

NO
Call: “We are going again. Stand by.”

YES
Proceed

Last Looks

Picture is up. Last looks.
Camera ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Director ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Going for picture

We are going for picture. Lock it up.
  • It’s GO time. Listen to ensure set is locked up. Be very sure EVERYONE is actually ready, especially DR and actors, before calling:
  • COVID: Slating should be at least six feet from any actors. If the lens or space does not allow for that, a pan over to the slate should be used instead.
  • COVID: Actors should remove their own masks. If the shot doesn’t permit them to keep the mask on their person, PD should provide a Ziploc bag with the actor’s name on it and PD should manage the Ziploc bags during takes.
  • COVID: If hair and makeup needs to make an adjustment due to the masks, this should occur swiftly.
  • COVID: If DR wants to go again quickly, and actors consent, masks can stay off between takes.
Roll sound...
  • If sound is being recorded on a dedicated field recorder, use Cadence for Dual-System Sound.
  • If sound is being recorded by the camera, use Cadence for Single-System Sound.
Cadence for dual-system sound

  • SM calls SPEED
  • 2C VOICE SLATES
  • 1C rolls camera and Camera Operator calls SPEED
  • 2C calls MARKER and clacks the sticks
  • Camera Operator calls FRAME
  • 1D calls MASKS OFF (actors remove masks)
  • DR calls ACTION, watches take, and calls CUT
  • 1D calls MASKS ON (actors replace masks)

Cadence for single-system sound

  • 1C rolls camera and Camera Operator calls SPEED
  • 2C VOICE SLATES
  • 2C calls MARKER and clacks the sticks
  • Camera Operator calls FRAME
  • 1D calls MASKS OFF (actors remove masks)
  • DR calls ACTION, watches take, and calls CUT
  • 1D calls MASKS ON (actors replace masks)

That's a cut on picture. Stand by.
  • 1D checks in with camera and sound to see if the take was good or if a technical issue may require another take.
  • 1D relays this information to DR, and checks to see if the DR would like to go again or move on to the next set-up.
Ready to move on?

NO
Repeat

YES
Proceed

Moving on

Thank you, First Team
  • 2D escorts the actors (and DR if desired) off set and the crew comes in to execute the next set-up.
  • COVID: After the First Team has left the set, 1D allows crew to re-enter the space.
We are moving on to... (describe next set-up)
  • Move on to the next planned set-up as indicated previously during the New Deal. 1D restates shot as previously described.
  • Return to BUILDING IT and proceed until all scene coverage is complete.
  • When the scene is complete, return to WORKING OUT THE BLOCKING for next scene.
  • Continue this process for the rest of the day.
  • During the day, if the production falls behind schedule or if any problems arise, 1D should be proactive in conferring privately with DR and/or DP on how to solve the problems. This can be done quietly and discreetly on set or during breaks, such as lunch.
  • COVID: Departments should sanitize equipment throughout the day during free moments, especially anything to be handled by others in the department.

Important Time-Based Items

Start of Day

First shot is off at (state time)
  • Recording the time of the first shot of the day (and the first shot after lunch) is an important item that is reported to the studio on the DPR.

Midday

That's lunch
  • At exactly the 6-hour mark after first call time Lunch must be called. If the team has already rolled on a set-up you can go into “Grace,” which means work must then be completed within 12 minutes. You cannot shoot past this or you are in meal penalty.
  • During lunch, 1D talks to DR and the DP about the rest of the day’s work and participates in making any adjustments to the plan and/or schedule to help make the day.
  • COVID: Boxed lunches should be delivered to the team spaces for each department, so as to avoid having people congregating around a single lunch table.
  • COVID: Since masks need to be off for eating, extra precaution must be taken. Eating outside with maximum distance between people is recommended.
  • COVID: Staggering the start time for lunch for different departments is recommended, if the schedule permits. Staggering the start time for lunch is required if physical distancing is not possible at the location.
Ten Minutes
  • Ten minutes before the end of lunch the 1st AD announces this to everyone.
We're back
  • This call marks the official end of lunch. All crew is required to return to work. 1D should remind everyone what set-up is first up after lunch.
  • COVID: After lunch, PR makes sure that high-touch surfaces get a sanitizing wipe down and each department sanitizes heavily used items of equipment.

End of Day

This is the Abby Singer
  • 1D alerts the crew that this is the second-to-last set up. (Be sure it actually is before announcing.) This is a morale boost as the day nears its end.
This is the martini
  • 1D alerts the crew that this is the last set up of the day. (BE SURE it actually is before announcing.) This is a bigger morale boost as the day nears its end.
That's a day (and/or picture) wrap for
(actor's name)
  • Crew applauds to thank the talent for the day’s work or for their work over multiple days on the whole picture.
That's a day (and/or picture) wrap for
(production name)
  • Crew celebrates a hard day’s work. “Picture Wrap” can be an emotional call after weeks of work on a feature.
Company Wrap
  • 1D talks to the DR and the DP about the next day’s work and any adjustments to the plan and/or schedule.
  • 1D signs off on the Daily Production Report (DPR), which is sent back to production by the 2D.
  • COVID: 1D makes sure that camera wrap happens no less than 60 minutes before company wrap, to allow sufficient time for loading out and cleaning the location.
  • COVID: Actors change out of wardrobe, preferably in a single-person occupancy changing room. PD places any wardrobe supplied by the production in a secure bag to be laundered if used again. If actors need to remove their masks, the changing room becomes a Zone A space.
  • COVID: Equipment should be reloaded back into the truck in a prescribed sequence. Only one crew member is permitted in the back of the truck at a time. Physical distancing must be observed at all times. Each department should clean equipment during wrap.
  • COVID: Doors Down Meeting should ideally be performed outside. If the space does not permit all crew to congregate with adequate physical distancing, the crew may divide up into departmental groups for separate, smaller doors down meetings.
  • COVID: 2D keeps access to location restricted until last crew member has left. The plan for sanitizing the location at company wrap must be completed before the 2D leaves the location.

Public Domain & Creative Commons Resources

The Internet is a wonderful place for finding videos, images, motion graphics, clip art, music, and sound effects that can be used in your films. Below is a list of resources to help with finding stuff that’s either in the Public Domain (belongs to all of us) or Creative Commons (licensed by the author for others to use).

Beware, however, that the Internet is also a terribly unreliable place and the burden of proof will fall on you to document that you actually have the rights to use any of the stuff you dig up, so that you have a clear chain of title on your film.

For works in the Public Domain, this can sometimes take a fair amount of research, as there is often unclear and unreliable information circulating about works that are supposedly in the public domain. Any works published in 1924 or earlier are now in the public domain. Any works published after 1924 should be assumed to be under copyright, unless otherwise confirmed. Also be aware that new versions of works public domain — e.g., the New York Symphony Orchestra’s recent recording of Beethoven’s 9th Symphony are copyrighted. In other words, you could perform the composition yourself and be okay, but you couldn’t use the New York Symphony Orchestra’s recording without clearing it first.

For Creative Commons work, some license types (such as “NoDerivs” and “ShareAlike”) are not compatible with the work we do, so you would not be able to use that work in your film. Generally speaking, you’ll need to look for works that are licensed either as “Attribution” or “Attribution-NonCommercial”. (Note, however, that many authors who’ve opted for a NoDerivs or ShareAlike license may be open to giving you permission to use their work if you contact them directly. If they are willing, you’ll need to follow the usual process of acquiring a licensing agreement for a copyrighted work.)

Videos

Images

Motion Graphics

Clip art

Music

  • Muse Open – classical music
  • Free Music Archive – interactive library of high-quality, legal audio downloads directed by WFMU, the most renowned freeform radio station in America.
  • Free music public domain
  • Freesound – a collaborative database of Creative Commons Licensed sounds.
  • Anthony Kozar – Composer and open-source programmer
  • Audionautix – The music on this site is the creation of Jason Shaw.
  • Bensound.com – Download royalty free stock music for YouTube and your multimedia projects.
  • Brett Van Donsel provides affordable music options for filmmakers, YouTubers, gamers, podcasters, advertisers and more. Most of the music is royalty free. 
  • Filmmusic.io – Over 600 tracks, free even for commercial use, primarily with cinematic music by Sascha Ende.
  • Gravity Sound – Free Music and Sound Effects for Personal and Commercial Use
  • Incompetech – Royalty free music by Kevin MacLeod
  • Josh Woodward – Acoustic indie rock singer/songwriter. Creative Commons Music.
  • King James – Royalty free music
  • Kongano.com – This site contains royalty-free mp3s for you to listen, download and do whatever you want with.
  • Natentine – Download the right royalty free music for YouTube videos, film, corporate videos, games and more.
  • Silverman Sound Studios – Background music for YouTube, videos, games, films, adverts, podcasts, anything! All totally free to download!
  • TechnoAXE – Royalty Free Music for your commercial/non-commercial videos or projects. This website has Techno, Dubstep, Metal, Rock or Soundtrack.
  • Tim Beek – Music for media
  • Twin Musicom – Innovative audio production
  • WOWA – Free music

Sound effects

Safety Bulletins

Safety Bulletins are researched, written, and distributed by the Industry-Wide Labor-Management Safety Committee for use by the motion picture and television industry. The Safety Committee is composed of guild, union, and management representatives active in industry safety and health programs.

Safety Bulletins are guidelines recommended by the Safety Committee. They are not binding laws or regulations. State, federal, and/or local regulations, where applicable, override these guidelines. Modifications in these guidelines should be made, as circumstances warrant, to ensure the safety of the cast and crew.

A PDF of all relevant Safety Bulletins must be attached to Call Sheets or otherwise distributed to affected employees. All crew are required to read distributed Safety Bulletins prior to commencing the work day. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action, including immediate dismissal from the school.

General Safety

Animals

Artificial Haze

Chemicals and Flammable Materials

Electrical Safety

Environmental Concerns

Filming Equipment and Vehicles

Stunts and Special Effects

Water Hazards

Weapons

Weather

Caption

1st AD Protocol

Overview

This document is intended to serve as a guide to help 1st Assistant Directors understand the role, as well as to supply set-specific jargon and the proper sequence of “callouts,” which are only a small part of the 1st AD’s job.

The role of the 1st AD is an important and multi-faceted one, involving organization, anticipation, communication, problem-solving, leadership, support, morale-building, time-budgeting, and resource allocation. It is a role that is critical in planning and scheduling a film during prep, and one that is vital for smooth set operation during production. The 1st AD runs the set and works just as hard as either the DP or the Director.

It is the responsibility of the 1st AD to know where everyone is, so crew must inform the AD department if they briefly leave set (e.g., “I’m 10-1”). The 1st AD always remains by camera; if the show has a base camp away from set, the 1st AD should communicate with the 2nd AD by radio. The 1st AD tracks the time but does not harass people about it. Good ADs need never raise their voice because they have not allowed things to reach that point. Above all else, it is the 1st AD’s job to watch, facilitate, and anticipate problems for the betterment of the film, not simply to “make the day.”

GREEN CALLS
ARE MADE OVER THE RADIO AND REPEATED BY 2ND AD

BLUE CALLS
ARE MADE ONLY TO ON-SET CREW AND NOT REPEATED BY 2ND AD

Daily Protocol

Having already been instrumental in helping to schedule the order of shots and estimating the time for each, a typical day for the 1st AD on set goes as follows. Note: On shows with smaller crews – such as F1s and F2s – some of the crew positions listed in this protocol may not have a dedicated crew member performing the role. If there is not a dedicated 2nd AD, the 1st AD should either assume those responsibilities or delegate them to another person. If there is not a dedicated Script Supervisor or 2nd AC, the Producer is responsible for making sure that other crew members cover the relevant tasks described in this protocol.

Morning Meeting

We are having the morning meeting
  • Precisely at call time, the 1D gathers the crew by the trucks for the morning meeting. The 1D goes over the logistics of the day and addresses safety concerns.
  • COVID: Due to the congregation of all crew members, the morning meeting should ideally be performed outside. If the space does not permit all crew to congregate with physical distancing, the crew should be divided into smaller groups and the meeting should be repeated for each group.
Work safely, everyone
  • This concludes the morning meeting. 1D then gathers DR, DP, SS, 2C, and goes to set.

WORKING OUT THE BLOCKING

Clear the set for blocking
  • If DR is ready, the 1D asks 2D to escort the actors to set, so that DR and actors can work out the blocking. During this time, 1D manages crew staging, while periodically monitoring DR.
Are we ready to mark the blocking?
  • If DR is ready, 1D invites DP, SS, and 2C to set and oversees the determination of coverage.

WORKING OUT THE COVERAGE

Observe the crew working out the coverage
  • DR and DP watch the action that’s been worked out with the actors. Together they discuss any changes. 1D watches and checks that: DP watches the coverage through a viewfinder or lens; SS watches eyelines and notes coverage plan; 2C marks the actors’ stopped positions with colored tape.
  • COVID: Physical distancing must be maintained during the laying down of marks. Either the actors should step back while the 2C lays down the mark, or the actor should be provided tape to lay down their own mark.
Are we ready for the New Deal?
  • Only when the plan is agreed upon, 1D calls:

NEW DEAL

We have a New Deal
  • 1D confirms all department heads are present. DR shows the action.
  • COVID: If physical distancing is not possible due to space limitations, the New Deal should be repeated for smaller clusters of department heads.
Questions on the blocking?
  • DR fields queries, then shows/explains coverage.
Questions on the coverage?
  • DR fields questions on the plan. 1D facilitates, making sure every department is anticipating issues.
Is the plan good?

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

BUILDING IT

OK, let's build it. Thank you, First Team.
  • 2D escorts First Team (DR and actors) to base camp. 1D quietly gets a setup time estimate from the DP. (Note: No one else but 1D and DR need ask about time or guess how long things will take.) From this point on, 1D is quietly monitoring progress and updating department time estimates.
  • Ways of being helpful throughout this process include: “Let’s get the frame” … “Let’s get focus” … “Let’s get a boom line” … “Work quietly”
  • COVID: Crew must maintain physical distancing at all times, except for where a technical operation makes it impossible. Such moments should be kept to a bare minimum and undertaken with extreme caution. If the space does not permit crew members to maintain physical distancing, 1D must organize the staggering and rotation of different departments’ work. This is something that should have been identified during the tech scout, so a plan should already have been discussed for this in advance of the production day.
  • COVID: Camera placement should be more than six feet away from any actor. Any exceptions to this need to have been approved during Director’s Prep.
  • COVID: Set up video village in a location to minimize crowding around the monitor. Only two, physically distancing crew members may be at video village at one time, with priority given to DR and SS.
  • COVID: SM gives a sanitized wireless lav to each actor and instructs them how to secure the mic. If necessary, SM may secure the mic themselves, but the physical proximity should be kept to a minimum duration and an extra level of protection should be considered, such as a face-shield or a plexiglass divider.
Are we ready for camera rehearsal?

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Camera Rehearsal

Camera rehearsal is up. Stand by.
  • 2D asks DR if they wish to be present. DR either comes to set or 2D informs 1D to proceed without DR. (If DR does not come to set, 1D calls “action” and “cut” instead.)
  • COVID: Do not use actors for the camera rehearsal, and keep minimal crew on set.
Camera ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
We are going for camera rehearsal...
  • Action is called. Technical team runs shot.
...That's a cut on camera rehearsal
How was that for camera?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
How was that for sound?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

BAD FOR EITHER
Troubleshoot

GOOD FOR BOTH
Proceed

Camera ready for rehearsal?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready for rehearsal?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Rehearsal

Essential personnel only, please.
  • COVID: The set is about to become a Zone A space, so 1D clears the set of all non-essential personnel.
First Team in, please
  • 2D brings DR and actors to set. Everything must be ready!
Everyone work quietly. First team is on set.
  • DR works with actors. (Note: Rehearsal moves directly into shooting. If any technical issue arise that cannot be solved immediately, 1D releases First Team until it is solved.)
  • COVID: Actors should ideally remain in masks during rehearsals. If masks need to be removed for any reason, consider deploying other protections, such as plexiglass barriers.
Rehearsal is up. Stand by.
  • 1D waits and confirms visually when DR is ready.
Quiet, please. We are going for rehearsal...
  • DR calls “action” and “cut.” This should be treated like it is a take by all set personnel. Make sure the set is locked up.
...That's a cut on rehearsal. Stand by.
  • While DR checks in with the actors, 1D checks in with camera and sound for feedback. 1D relays this information to DR, who chooses to rehearse again or proceed.
Are we ready to shoot?

NO
Call: “We are going again.
Stand by.”

YES
Proceed

Last Looks

Picture is up. Last looks.
Camera ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Director ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Going for picture

We are going for picture. Lock it up.
  • It’s GO time. Listen to ensure set is locked up. Be very sure EVERYONE is actually ready, especially DR and actors, before calling:
  • COVID: Slating should be at least six feet from any actors. If the lens or space does not allow for that, a pan over to the slate should be used instead.
  • COVID: Actors should remove their own masks. If the shot doesn’t permit them to keep the mask on their person, PD should provide a Ziploc bag with the actor’s name on it and PD should manage the Ziploc bags during takes.
  • COVID: If hair and makeup needs to make an adjustment due to the masks, this should occur swiftly.
  • COVID: If DR wants to go again quickly, and actors consent, masks can stay off between takes.
Roll sound...
  • If sound is being recorded on a dedicated field recorder, use Cadence for Dual-System Sound.
  • If sound is being recorded by the camera, use Cadence for Single-System Sound.
Cadence for dual-system sound

  • SM calls SPEED
  • 2C VOICE SLATES
  • 1C rolls camera and Camera Operator calls SPEED
  • 2C calls MARKER and clacks the sticks
  • Camera Operator calls FRAME
  • 1D calls MASKS OFF (actors remove masks)
  • DR calls ACTION, watches take, and calls CUT
  • 1D calls MASKS ON (actors replace masks)

Cadence for single-system sound

  • 1C rolls camera and Camera Operator calls SPEED
  • 2C VOICE SLATES
  • 2C calls MARKER and clacks the sticks
  • Camera Operator calls FRAME
  • 1D calls MASKS OFF (actors remove masks)
  • DR calls ACTION, watches take, and calls CUT
  • 1D calls MASKS ON (actors replace masks)

That's a cut on picture. Stand by.
  • 1D checks in with camera and sound to see if the take was good or if a technical issue may require another take.
  • 1D relays this information to DR, and checks to see if the DR would like to go again or move on to the next set-up.
Ready to move on?

NO
Repeat

YES
Proceed

Moving on

Thank you, First Team
  • 2D escorts the actors (and DR if desired) off set and the crew comes in to execute the next set-up.
  • COVID: After the First Team has left the set, 1D allows crew to re-enter the space.
We are moving on to... (describe next set-up)
  • Move on to the next planned set-up as indicated previously during the New Deal. 1D restates shot as previously described.
  • Return to BUILDING IT and proceed until all scene coverage is complete.
  • When the scene is complete, return to WORKING OUT THE BLOCKING for next scene.
  • Continue this process for the rest of the day.
  • During the day, if the production falls behind schedule or if any problems arise, 1D should be proactive in conferring privately with DR and/or DP on how to solve the problems. This can be done quietly and discreetly on set or during breaks, such as lunch.
  • COVID: Departments should sanitize equipment throughout the day during free moments, especially anything to be handled by others in the department.

Important Time-Based Items

Start of Day

First shot is off at (state time)
  • Recording the time of the first shot of the day (and the first shot after lunch) is an important item that is reported to the studio on the DPR.

Midday

That's lunch
  • At exactly the 6-hour mark after first call time Lunch must be called. If the team has already rolled on a set-up you can go into “Grace,” which means work must then be completed within 12 minutes. You cannot shoot past this or you are in meal penalty.
  • During lunch, 1D talks to DR and the DP about the rest of the day’s work and participates in making any adjustments to the plan and/or schedule to help make the day.
  • COVID: Boxed lunches should be delivered to the team spaces for each department, so as to avoid having people congregating around a single lunch table.
  • COVID: Since masks need to be off for eating, extra precaution must be taken. Eating outside with maximum distance between people is recommended.
  • COVID: Staggering the start time for lunch for different departments is recommended, if the schedule permits. Staggering the start time for lunch is required if physical distancing is not possible at the location.
Ten Minutes
  • Ten minutes before the end of lunch the 1st AD announces this to everyone.
We're back
  • This call marks the official end of lunch. All crew is required to return to work. 1D should remind everyone what set-up is first up after lunch.
  • COVID: After lunch, PR makes sure that high-touch surfaces get a sanitizing wipe down and each department sanitizes heavily used items of equipment.

End of Day

This is the Abby Singer
  • 1D alerts the crew that this is the second-to-last set up. (Be sure it actually is before announcing.) This is a morale boost as the day nears its end.
This is the martini
  • 1D alerts the crew that this is the last set up of the day. (BE SURE it actually is before announcing.) This is a bigger morale boost as the day nears its end.
That's a day (and/or picture) wrap for
(actor's name)
  • Crew applauds to thank the talent for the day’s work or for their work over multiple days on the whole picture.
That's a day (and/or picture) wrap for
(production name)
  • Crew celebrates a hard day’s work. “Picture Wrap” can be an emotional call after weeks of work on a feature.
Company Wrap
  • 1D talks to the DR and the DP about the next day’s work and any adjustments to the plan and/or schedule.
  • 1D signs off on the Daily Production Report (DPR), which is sent back to production by the 2D.
  • COVID: 1D makes sure that camera wrap happens no less than 60 minutes before company wrap, to allow sufficient time for loading out and cleaning the location.
  • COVID: Actors change out of wardrobe, preferably in a single-person occupancy changing room. PD places any wardrobe supplied by the production in a secure bag to be laundered if used again. If actors need to remove their masks, the changing room becomes a Zone A space.
  • COVID: Equipment should be reloaded back into the truck in a prescribed sequence. Only one crew member is permitted in the back of the truck at a time. Physical distancing must be observed at all times. Each department should clean equipment during wrap.
  • COVID: Doors Down Meeting should ideally be performed outside. If the space does not permit all crew to congregate with adequate physical distancing, the crew may divide up into departmental groups for separate, smaller doors down meetings.
  • COVID: 2D keeps access to location restricted until last crew member has left. The plan for sanitizing the location at company wrap must be completed before the 2D leaves the location.

Daily Production Reports

The Second Assistant Director is responsible for sending out a PDF of the Daily Production Report (DPR) at the end of every shooting day, no later than two hours after wrap. If the production does not have a dedicated Second Assistant Director, the First Assistant Director or Producer shall assume the responsibility.

The purpose of the DPR is to communicate important information from the day’s production, such as number of setups, start and end times, in and out times, reports on delays, and reports on equipment problems. If an urgent problem or situation arises on set, however, do not wait until the end of day to report it; contact the appropriate individuals immediately. (Make sure it is documented on the DPR at the end of the day as well, though.)

Daily Production Report Template

Email the DPR to x3i7c6r6s9u9v5r4@fsu-cmpa.slack.com or post directly to the #dpr channel on Slack.

 The subject of the message must be formatted with production number and show title as follows: 01f3-Film Title - DPR - Day 1

Sample DPR

Call Sheets

The Second Assistant Director is responsible for distributing a PDF of each day’s call sheet to the cast, crew, faculty, and FSU police. If the production does not have a dedicated Second Assistant Director, the First Assistant Director or Producer shall assume the responsibility.

The purpose of the call sheet is to provide cast, crew, faculty, and FSU police all the pertinent information they may need to know about the next day’s production. It is important to thoroughly check — and double-check — and triple-check — that all the information in the call sheet is correct before it is sent out, because the distribution of revisions can create confusion.

Call sheets, along with any relevant additional information such as maps or safety bulletins, must be emailed out no later than 12 hours before call time on the first day of production and no later than the previous day’s company wrap for all subsequent days.

Call Sheet Template

Email format

The email subject must be formatted with production number and show title included, as follows: 01f3-Film Title - Call Sheet - Day 1

You may include a brief, executive summary of important information in the body of the email, but this should not be a substitute for providing all relevant information in the call sheet itself.

Recipient list

Sample call sheet

Water & Messy Items

Water effects on the stages

Water must not be allowed to pool on the stage floor, or seep under set pieces or floor covers. If hoses or other connections for water lines are used on stage, lines and connections must be continually monitored for leaks, which must be repaired immediately.

There must always be an approved plan in place to immediately drain off water from a water effect. For rain effects, a gutter may be used to collect water in a small area, but for larger effects, a pool must be used or built from thick plastic and 2×4’s to form a raised edge to trap the water inside. A plan must be made and approved for removal of the water from these pools, and water that will inevitably be tracked around the stage by wet feet and equipment. A pool or other vessel of water may never be left overnight. The Stage Supervisor will monitor water effects. At any time the Stage Supervisor or Set Operations Manager may shut down the production to ensure the safety of crew, equipment and facilities.

Dirt, Sand, Paint, or other messy items

When a production intends to use loose material such as dirt, or wet material such as paint, the student production designer will be required to show preparation for protection of the area and removal of the materials before receiving approval. Dirt contains moisture, so a moisture barrier must be put on the floor, or the dirt must otherwise be kept from coming in contact with the stage floor. As dirt, peanut shells, paint, and other messy materials can be tracked into other areas of the building, plans must be made to clean feet and to prevent such tracking. Mats or drop cloths, and small brushes or brooms must be supplied so crew and cast can clean their feet before exiting the stage or work area.

Water Hazards

The following procedures are recommended for all water work, including, but not limited to ponds, rivers, lakes, swamps, bogs, oceans, pools, and tanks, or any other unduly wet work environment.

Identification of potential contaminants or hazards

Know as much as you can about the body of water you’re working on or in, including its natural hazards and animal life. The Production Company, Location Manager or the Safety Coordinator should have all relevant information.

The Producer should identify and make known prior to actual filming, all available knowledge regarding currents and natural or man-made hazards, including sub-surface objects, underwater life, and contamination. Upstream activities, such as dams, waste disposal sites, agriculture, chemical plant dumping sites, flash flood dangers, etc. should also be evaluated. If a potential safety hazard is found to exist, the Producer should take appropriate steps to mitigate the hazard.

Prior to personnel entering a body of water, a determination should be made that the water quality meets the applicable regulatory standards for recreational full body contact. Samples of the water should be taken and analyzed for any potential environmental concerns and/or health hazards. If it is determined that a body of water is contaminated or hazardous, the contamination or hazard should be neutralized or the site shall be avoided. 

Extreme care should be taken regarding dangerous marine life, including reptiles.

All personnel should be advised to keep all potential contaminants away from the water, including paints, thinners, repellents, gasoline, oils, etc.

Notifying and protecting personnel

All personnel scheduled for water work shall be notified in advance via the Call Sheet. Personnel who are uncomfortable working in or around water should notify their supervisor prior to that day’s call.

All personnel working in or around water shall be provided with the appropriate water safety devices, such as life vests or other water safety gear when appropriate. (See Safety Bulletin: Recommendations for Diving Operations.)

When necessary, the Producer should implement a plan to account for personnel in the water, such as a “buddy” or a check in/check out system.

The Producer should take steps to prevent hyperthermia (elevated body temperature) and hypothermia (reduced body temperature).

Provisions for post-immersion washing should be available.

Lighting and electricity

Special care must be used whether AC or DC electricity is used in or around water. All electrical cables and lights in close proximity to water shall be properly secured to prevent tipping and falling. All wiring, electrical equipment and devices that will, or may be, subject to a submerged condition should be approved for underwater use, be watertight, have no exposed live connections and be constructed such that there is no shock hazard under any likely conditions of use. All applicable provisions of the National Electric Code should be followed. Local regulations may be more restrictive and should be consulted.

When lighting, electrical distribution, or any electrically powered equipment is used in close proximity to water or can make contact with water, the use of GFCI should be evaluated by a qualified person. This includes all areas where water hazards exist. When persons, wardrobe, props, or equipment are wet, the need for GFCI protection should be evaluated.GFCIs should not be used on circuits where removal of power may create a greater hazard, such as airbags, decelerators, emergency egress lighting, etc.

All electrical connections should be made by, or under the supervision of, a qualified person.

Other considerations

Safety lines, nets, watch safety personnel and/or divers should be used when filming in rivers or other bodies of water where potentially hazardous conditions could exist (e.g., swift currents, thick underwater plant life, or rocks).

When necessary for personnel to work in fast-moving rivers, downstream safety pickup personnel and safety equipment should be stationed for downstream emergency rescue.

When using watercraft, be aware of load and rider capacity limits. Only required personnel should be on watercraft; all others should remain on land. (See Safety Bulletin: Guidelines for Boating/Watercraft Safety.)

Safety bulletins

Stunts and Special Effects

All stunts and special effects must be reviewed by all participants and must be approved by faculty prior to execution to help ensure that they are performed in the safest manner possible. It is the Producer’s responsibility to make sure that the faculty has fully approved any such activities prior to the start of shooting, and any production plans that involve stunts or special effects must be described in detail at the show’s Director’s Prep. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • any form of running, jumping, climbing, balancing, or falling actions that are required of actors or stunt personnel;
  • any fight scenes;
  • any use of real or prop weapons;
  • any use of edged or piercing props;
  • any scenes involving the driving of vehicles;
  • any operation of potentially dangerous equipment;
  • any scenes involving animals;
  • any use of pyrotechnics, explosives, squibs, or fire;
  • any scenes involving potential water hazards;
  • any scenes involving potentially hazardous materials.

Stunt coordination

A qualified stunt coordinator must be in charge of all aspects of a physical stunt, including script review, planning, site selection, preparation, testing, rehearsal, modification, and recommendation of the qualified personnel and equipment to be utilized to perform the stunt.

When a Producer requires a performer to perform a stunt or stunt-related activity, an individual qualified by training and/or experience in planning, setting up, and/or performance of the type of stunt involved must be engaged and present on the set. No performer without the requisite training and/or experience shall be required to perform a stunt or stunt-related activity without an opportunity for prior consultation by the performer with such qualified individual. A performer must consent to participation in the stunt prior to its performance.

Advance notice is to be given to stunt personnel in order to plan a safe stunt. If changes are made to these plans, the Producer is to provide sufficient time to safely accommodate the changes and obtain faculty approval for the changes.

An on-site safety meeting, including all participants and others involved, must precede the performance of all stunts. This meeting must be documented and must include a “walk-through” or “dry-run” with the stunt coordinator and/or effects people. An understanding of the intended action, possible deviations, and authority to abort should be made clear. Before rolling cameras, should any substantive change become necessary, the First Assistant Director will again call all persons involved in the stunt to another meeting to confirm everyone’s understanding and agreement to said change(s), and faculty approval must again be obtained.

Under no circumstances should a stunt or special effect be improvised on set without prior faculty approval. Failing to adhere to this policy may result in immediate dismissal from the College of the Producer and any other students deemed responsible for the violation.

Appropriate Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) and/or other safety equipment must be provided to the cast and crew as needed. Wardrobe, hair, and make-up should be presented in sufficient time to determine if such items will impact the execution of the stunt. Final safety approval rests with the stunt coordinator and/or qualified individual.

The stunt coordinator and/or qualified individual shall determine whether safety requires the exclusion of non-essential crew from the stunt area. Perimeter control should be established and maintained. Traffic control procedures shall be reviewed, and special attention should be paid to driving sequences where unauthorized personnel could enter the area. The stunt coordinator and/or qualified individual should be involved in safe placement of cameras, camera operators and all essential crew. There must be a planned escape route and each person involved should personally check all escape routes.

Pyrotechnics, explosives, and fire

Special effects involving pyrotechnics, explosives and/or fire must be noted in advance on the call sheet. Properly licensed individuals must perform all such effects. The necessary permits must be obtained and the appropriate regulatory agencies notified. Explosives must be stored and disposed of properly.

Radios, cell phones, personal electronic devices, transmitting equipment, and remote control equipment should not be used around pyrotechnic or other explosive devices.

Safety bulletins

Electrical Safety

All electrical systems and electrically energized equipment are potentially hazardous, whether Alternating Current (AC) or Direct Current (DC), whether 50 volts, 120 volts or higher. Therefore, electrical equipment should only be used for its intended purpose and only qualified personnel with the appropriate technical knowledge should perform electrical work.

General safeguards

  1. Properly maintain all electrical equipment and wiring. Visually inspect the condition of the plug, cable, and equipment for any signs of excess wear, frayed cables or exposed current-carrying parts. DO NOT USE any equipment that is damaged.
  2. Verify all equipment is in the OFF position prior to plugging or unplugging to avoid creating an arc at the receptacle. Wear protective gloves to avoid injury from a possible flash created by a short-circuit in the equipment.
  3. Do not pull on the cord when unplugging equipment. This can cause one or more of the wires to pull out of its termination in the plug. Always grasp the plug firmly to unplug.
  4. All persons working on or near energized electrical equipment shall wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) appropriate for the level of electrical hazard to which they are exposed. This PPE may include non-melting, long-sleeved shirts and long pants, or other Arc Rated (AR) clothing, and closed-toed, nonconductive-soled shoes and Safety Glasses. Garments made from synthetic materials not manufactured specifically for electrical work, such as polyester and nylon, are not suitable to protect from electrical hazards.

Alternating Current and Direct Current

  1. When using both AC and DC systems in the same location, each system must be clearly identified as AC or DC. Always verify that you are not plugging AC equipment into DC systems or DC equipment into AC systems.
  2. All AC electrical systems shall be grounded. All grounded equipment should be tested for continuity between the ground pin on the plug and the metal parts of the equipment before it is put into service. In addition, all cables should be tested for continuity of the ground, neutral and phase conductor

Connecting to house power (tie-in)

  1. Connecting to a premises/house electrical power source, such as a panel board or switchboard, can create the risk of a serious or fatal accident. Such connections shall only be made by a qualified person.
  2. Connecting to an energized system is strongly discouraged. Always consider exposed electrical parts to be energized until you have verified they have been de-energized and locked out/tagged out.
  3. Keep electric panels accessible at all times. There should be no obstructions or storage within three feet (3’) of a panel. Fuses should only be replaced by qualified personnel. When replacing a blown fuse, be sure to select a fuse of proper voltage, interrupting capacity, and amperage for the application.
  4. Prior to a qualified person connecting to a premises/house electrical power system, the following requirements, among others, must be adhered to:
    • Determine if the electrical system voltage is compatible with the equipment to which it will be connected.
    • Calculate the electrical panel’s existing maximum ampere load to determine if the remaining capacity is sufficient for the additional equipment being connected.
    • Use a properly sized circuit breaker or fusible disconnect switch to connect a distribution system to the premises/house electrical power system.
    • The rated interrupting capacity of the circuit breaker or fuses must meet the available interrupting capacity at the point of connection to the premises/house electrical power system.
    • Use only approved lugs or devices to connect to the panel bus.
    • Never use “Alligator” type clamps.
    • Never connect ahead of the main circuit breaker, fuse box, or meter.
    • If required, obtain a permit to remove a panel cover.
    • Use suitable barriers, partitions, or other means to limit access to the connection to protect against accidental contact with energized parts and unauthorized entry into the arc-flash boundary by unauthorized persons or objects.
    • Replacement of all panels, covers and screws must be done by a qualified person immediately after disconnecting from the premises/house electrical power system.

Generators

  1. Only a qualified operator shall operate a generator. Approach to exposed connections on portable and vehicle mounted generators should be physically restricted or barricaded to non-qualified persons. 
  2. The generator should have as much open space as possible on all sides to allow maximum ventilation and minimum interference. Make sure exhaust fumes are ventilated away from enclosed areas, personnel, and air intake ducts, such as trailers and buildings. Be aware of hot surfaces when working around a generator. It is important that all generating sets be protected from the elements and from unauthorized access.
  3. A fire extinguisher specific for the generator unit must be present and readily accessible outside the generator enclosure. 

Location and environmental considerations

  1. Cables and devices should be protected from water and from foot and vehicle traffic damage. Electrical distribution systems should be elevated in such a manner that they will not come in contact with running or standing water. When it is necessary to have electrical distribution systems and devices which come into contact with water, such systems shall be designed and listed for use in water.
  2. Remember that lights placed too closely to props, sets and other materials may pose a fire risk and, therefore, make sure that lights are placed far enough away to alleviate risk.
  3. Overhead clearances must be observed and maintained at all times. This applies to ladders, scaffolds, booms, forklifts, aerial lifts, scissor lifts, cranes, rigging, sets, truss work, backdrops and other equipment that could come in contact with power lines.
  4. To prevent electrocutions and injury resulting from contact between overhead power lines and conductive tools, materials, or scaffolds, OSHA recommends that employees be informed that most overhead, high voltage power lines are not insulated and, when in doubt, employees should assume that power lines are not insulated.
  5. Employers should notify the utility company when work must be performed under and/or near overhead power lines where clearances cannot be maintained. In such situations, utility companies should de-energize the power lines or temporarily move or cover them with insulating hoses or blankets before any work is initiated.

Emergency Response

  1. If an electrical accident occurs, notify emergency medical personnel and activate the Emergency Action Plan.
  2. An Emergency Action Plan should include the following items:
    • Location, method and any necessary tools required for emergency power disconnection
    • Emergency Medical Services on hand or readily available with working means of contact
    • Exact location of where the work is being performed
    • Identification of CPR Trained Personnel
    • Location of available AEDs
  3. Do not approach any electrical accident until you have been notified by qualified personnel that it is safe to approach.
  4. Properly secure the accident area while maintaining a safe distance to prevent the possibility of additional victims.
  5. DO NOT touch or approach a victim of electric shock while he or she is being shocked. If safe to do so, turn off the power.
  6. Trained personnel should follow proper procedures for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (“CPR”) and Automated External Defibrillator (“AED”) use.
  7. Since the possible effects of electrical shock can manifest hours after the event, any victim of electric shock must be evaluated by a qualified medical professional.

Safety bulletins