Picture Lock

At the end of the picture edit cycle, the Editor and Director will be assigned a time to formally lock picture. This means that the Lock Sequence must be completed by that time and the appropriate fields must be filled out in Motion.

Once picture locking is complete, the Editor and Director will work with the Post Staff to prep the film for the next phases of the post-production chain, which includes turn over for sound, color correction, and (if relevant) visual effects.

Create the Locked sequence

In Premiere Pro, correctly identify your locked sequence and save it in the Lock bin as Show#_Lock. For example, the locked sequence for 01F3 would be named 01F3_Lock.

Double-check the sequence settings by clicking on the Sequence drop-down menu and selecting “Sequence Settings.”

Your locked sequence settings should be as follows:

Build the front sequence

All locked sequences must have a “front sequence” at the start of the timeline that is formatted to Academy standards. This involves setting the sequence timecode to begin at 00:59:00:00 and building a front sequence that includes 30 seconds of bars-and-tone, 30 seconds of slate, the Academy leader (i.e., the countdown), and the FSU leader.

To begin, locate the front sequence materials (bars-and-tone, countdown, and FSU leaders).

Import these into your Premiere Project in the Front Sequence bin. Their are two different FSU Leaders. One runs “Forward” and one runs in “Reverse”. Choose one.

Set your sequence to begin at timecode 00:59:00:00. To do this, click on the Sequence drop-down menu and select “Start Time…”

Then enter “00:59:00:00” in the pop up window.

At 00:59:00:00 on the timeline, insert the 30-second bars-and-tone clip from the Front Sequence bin.

At 00:59:30:00 on the timeline, insert a 30-second slate. You’ll need to create the slate yourself, using the title tool in Premiere Pro. Please keep it professional and include all the pertinent info:

At 01:00:00:00, insert the 8-second countdown from the Front Sequence bin. If everything is put together correctly, the “two-pop” on the countdown leader will fall exactly on 01:00:06:00. (This is very important!)

At 01:00:08:00, insert one of the 8-second FSU leaders from the Front Sequence bin.

At 01:00:16:00, line up the first frame of content to start there.

Your completed front sequence should now look like this:

Add titles and credits

The College has strict requirements for how titles and credits need to be formatted. Before building your titles, read the requirements here.

Any credits that are finished by picture lock should be inserted into your Lock sequence. For credits that are outstanding (such as those that will be generated in After Effects later) you should slug the time in your sequence with a “Temp Credits” title card. It is possible to insert and change credits after picture lock but your running time cannot change. For this reason it is important that any unfinished credits be slugged in.

The second-to-last thing in the end credits should be a 2-second logo card. Select the card shown in the example below.

The last thing in the end credits should be a 2-second copyright card with your title treatment written above if. Double-check that the card has the correct copyright year.

Condense tracks for color grading

To prep your timeline for coloring your video needs to be condensed onto as few video tracks as possible. It’s understood that, due to the nature of how some video dissolves are built, more than one track is sometimes necessary. In addition you will have a track for your LUT and your Aspect Ratio Mask. The idea is to reduce the amount of tracks and media as much as possible and the end result should look something like this.

QC the locked sequence

The Director/Editorother problems. Once your picture is locked it is locked!

Save the project

Lastly, once you are confident that you’re locked sequence is formatted correctly and ready for conforming and turnover, save a new version in your projects finishing folder, but add “Locked” to the file name.

Reference Video

So you have something to watch while in Sound Design and to assist you in conforming bin Resolve and checking VFX you will need to export a video reference file. This video video will be exported to the Reference folder under Sound as shown below and will be labeled “Show#_Reference”

Under Export Settings for video you will set it as shown below.
-Format: Quicktime
-Video Codec: Apple ProRes 422 LT
-Resolution: 1920×1080
-Frame Rate: 24

Under the Audio tab make sure it is set as shown below.
-Audio Codec: Uncompressed
-Sample Rate: 48000Hz
-Sample Size: 24 bit

Under the Effects tab make sure it is set as shown below so that the reference video has timecode and a name burned into it. “Name Overlay” and “Timecode Overlay” should both be checked.

-Name Overlay: Formate should be set to “Output File Name and then position it from top to bottom.
-Timecode Overlay: Time Source should be set to generate timecode. Format set to 24 fps Timecode. And Start at ; 00:59:00:00

If you set everything correctly the timecode and name burn in should appear in the Output Window as shown below. Notice the timecode burn in matches the timecode of the playhead exactly.

Once everything is set properly you can export the reference to the correct folder.

Sound Turnover

Next you will need to export an AAF file to get your sound into ProTools. Duplicate your “Locked” sequence and Label the new Sequence “Show#_Sound_Turnover”

Delete all the video in this new sequence leaving only the audio tracks.

Then select Export AAF from the File Menu.

Set the AAF Export Settings EXACTLY as shown in the example below. If set this incorrectly you will have problems in sound design so take your time.

Export this AAF file to the AAF folder under Sound and label it “Show#_Sound_Turnover”

Once the Reference Video and the AAF are exported to the proper folders as shown below you are finished turning over for Sound.

Color Turnover

Duplicate your “Locked” sequence again and label the new Sequence “Show#_toResolve”.

Delete all the audio tracks. Also delete anything in the video tracks that does not need to be color corrected. This means delete, the aspect ratio matte, the LUT, any titles, the front sequences, and any credits. When you are done you should be left with a simple sequence with only your Log footage as shown below.

Then select Export XML from the File Menu.

Export this XML file to the XML folder under Color and label it “Show#_toResolve”.

In the finder copy and paste your Reference Video so taht it is also in the Reference folder under Color. Once the Reference Video and the XML are in the proper folders as shown below you are finished turning over for Color.

VFX Turnover

Duplicate your “Locked” sequence again and label the new Sequence “Show#_VFX_Turnover”.

Delete all the audio tracks. Also delete anything in the video tracks that is not either a VFX element that needs to be turned over or the LUT. When you are done you should be left with a simple sequence with the LUT on top and only your VFX shots as shown below.

Mark In and Out for each of your VFX shots as shown below taking note of what the clip is labeled. In the example below it is “3J_1”

Export each VFX element as a DPX Sequence with the settings shown below.

Set the Export Settings EXACTLY as shown in the example below. If set this incorrectly you will have problems in VFX so take your time.

Label the DPX Sequence as shown in the example making sure to include a underscore after the name. Make a folder for each DPX Sequence in the Out folder of VFX as shown in the example below.

When the export is completed the DPX sequence should look like the example below.

To test that your DPX sequence was exported properly, reimport them back into Premiere and lay them over the original footage in the timeline. They should be the exact same length and you should be able to google your DPX Sequence on and off and not see any chance compared to the OCF underneath.

Once you have exported every shot that you need as a VFX element you are done. If you have any questions about VFX turnover please consult the VFX faculty.