#pre-production

Documentary Equipment Approval

Production Paperwork

Instructions

This form must be completed and submitted to the Head of Production (Tony Ciarlariello) before a show’s greenlight meeting. The purpose of the form is to ensure that there’s a plan in place for all equipment use out in the field and to ensure that any personal gear is suitable for production.

Equipment Transportation Plan

This section is document where production will occur and the means of transportation for all school equipment. Note that the EVA1 camera and batteries cannot be checked if traveling by air and must be brought on the plane as carry-on luggage. Be prepared to any questions about the specifics of the transportation plan at the greenlight meeting.

Equipment Back-up Plan

Provide a plan for how you will continue with production if the EVA1 camera or any other essential equipment goes down while you are out in the field. This may include use of personal equipment to complete the project or, if local to Tallahassee, working with the ER to get equipment replaced or repaired. Note that the ER will not typically be able to mail equipment to another city if the show is outside the school’d studio zone.

Personal Equipment

In order to maintain consistency of image fidelity and to serve the learning outcomes of the project, the EVA1 camera should always be used as the primary camera for production. There are instances, however, where productions may wish to use a personal camera (e.g., as a b-camera or for shots that cannot be executed with the EVA1) or other, supplemental, personal equipment. Use this section to provide make/model/specs of any personal gear and an brief explanation of why this gear is needed for the film. Pay particular attention to personal camera specs to make sure that the captured media is compatible with the post-production workflow.

F1 Specs

Writing specs

Page count:3 pages
Quantity of locations:1 location
Quantity of characters:2 characters – written for specific actors 
Children:No
Animals:No
Weapons:No
Sexual intimacy:Nothing that would typically call for an intimacy coordinator
COVID restrictions:No actions that would require actors to be closer than six feet

Production specs

Locations per day:1 location
Distance to location:Must be within the studio zone
Shooting days:1 day
Pick-up days:No
Length of workday:12 hours, plus an hour for lunch
Earliest call time:6AM
Latest wrap time:12AM
Night shoots:No
COVID protocols:Yes

Data allocation

Final page count:3 pages
Shooting days:1 day
Pages per day:3 pages
Shooting ratio:20:1
Data rate:0.8 GB/minute
Max. data per page:16 GB
Max. data per day:48 GB
Max. dailies length:60 minutes
Max. dailies size:48 GB

Capture specs

Camera package:Panasonic AU-EVA1
Sensor mode:S35 MIX2.8K
Format:MOV
Resolution: 2048×1920 (2K)
Main codec:422All-Intra 100M
Frame rate:24p
Sampling:4:2:2 10-bit
Bitrate:100 Mbps (VBR)
Aspect ratio:1.37:1, 1.85:1, or 2.39:1

Editorial specs

Max. story content:3:30
Max. credits:1:00
Max. TRT:4:30
Pic edit software:Media Composer
Sound software:Media Composer
Coloring software:Media Composer
Pic edit days:7 days
Sound days:1 day
Coloring days:1 day
Titles and delivery:1 day
Visual effects:Only editorial effects that can be completed inside Media Composer

D1 Specs

Writing specs

Page count:2 pages
Quantity of scenes:1 scene – writing instructor may grant an exception if an additional scene does not pose safety or scope concerns
Quantity of locations:1 location – written for a specific space at Critchfield Hall
Quantity of characters:2 characters – written for specific actors from the theater school
Children:No
Animals:No
Weapons:No
Sexual intimacy:Nothing that would typically call for an intimacy coordinator
COVID restrictions:No actions that require would require actors to be closer than six feet

Production specs

Location:All shows shoot at Critchfield Hall
Shooting days:1 day
Length of workday:12 hours, plus an hour for lunch
Call times:Set by Head of Production
Night shoots:No
FIST agreement:Yes
COVID protocols:Yes

Data allocation

Final page count:2 pages
Shooting days:1 day
Pages per day:2 pages
Shooting ratio:20:1
Data rate:1.4 GB/minute
Max. data per page:28 GB
Max. data per day:56 GB
Max. dailies length:40 minutes
Max. dailies size:56 GB

Capture settings

Frame rate:24.000 fps
Record file format:Avid DNxHD/HR
Resolution:2K (2048×1080)
Video codec:Avid DNxHD/HR SQ
Baked-in settings:All image settings (Rec. 709 / SDR)
Mode:IPP2
Output color space:Rec. 709
Output tone map:Medium Contrast
Highlight roll-off:Medium
more info…

Editorial specs

Max. story content:2:30
Max. credits:1:00
Max. TRT:3:30
Pic edit software:Media Composer
Sound software:ProTools
Coloring software:Media Composer
Pic edit days:5 days
Sound days:2.5 days
Coloring days:0.5 days
Visual effects:No

Writing Parameters

COVID-19 Protocols

To help with mitigating risk, students will be provided with specific writing parameters that are appropriate to the level of production, including in some cases a reduced page count and limits on quantities of characters and locations. Due to students on earlier projects having less on-set experience and less time for preparing each show, introductory-level films will have stricter writing parameters than advanced-level films.

F1 Parameters

  • Three pages
  • One location, written for a specific location
  • Two characters, written for specific actors
  • No actions that require actors to be closer than six feet
  • No actions that might typically require an intimacy coordinator, such as nudity or physically sexual situations
  • No children
  • No animals
  • No weapons

D1 Parameters

  • Two pages
  • One scene
  • One location, written for a specific location
  • Two characters, written for specific actors
  • No actions that require actors to be closer than six feet
  • No actions that might typically require an intimacy coordinator, such as nudity or physically sexual situations
  • No children
  • No animals
  • No weapons
  • See more D1 specs…

F3, BTH, D2, MTH Parameters

  • No additional writing parameters
  • Students, however, should be mindful of the practical limitations of production when writing: e.g., only being able to shoot at one location each production day.

Tips for Writing During a Pandemic

As we develop scripts, it’s going to be important anticipate all the things that might elevate safety concerns during production. At the very least, any element in a script that gets flagged as a potential safety concern will require additional work during pre-production and production, in order for there to be a robust plan in place for the safety of the cast and crew. It’s therefore a good idea to be: (a) thinking about how you’ll address potential safety concerns as you develop a script; and (b) imagining alternative versions of scenes with a lot of red flags, so that you have a viable Plan B in your back pocket that mitigates more of the safety concerns. Below is a guide to some of the more common factors that of which to be mindful when you’re writing a scene.

LOCATIONS

QUANTITY OF LOCATIONS

Be mindful of how many locations you are writing into your script. The more locations you need, the more time you’ll need to spend on safely scouting and prepping each location. More locations will also raise the likelihood of needing to do company moves during a production day, which will raise additional safety concerns.

INTERIOR vs. EXTERIOR

Interior locations are generally going to have more safety concerns than exterior locations. As you write, it’s worth asking yourself whether an interior scene really needs to be an interior scene, and what might it look like if it were conceived instead as an exterior scene.

CRAMPED vs. SPACIOUS

Small, tight, cramped locations where social distancing is difficult are generally going to have more safety concerns than large, open, spacious locations. As you write, it’s good to ask yourself if a scene necessitates shooting in a cramped location, or if there are ways to cheat it or change it. Bathroom scenes are a good example, which are usually too cramped for production, even under normal circumstances. Therefore, you’ll either need to: (a) have a rigorous plan for how you could shoot the scene safely in a small bathroom; (b) find a really large bathroom that you can cheat to look smaller, which will likely be hard to find; or (c) rewrite the scene so that it doesn’t take place in a small bathroom.

PUBLIC vs. PRIVATE

Public locations are generally going to have more safety concerns than private locations. If a scene needs to be shot in public location, it will likely take a lot of additional work during production to sanitize the location. It will also take a lot of additional work to control the space, so that you can have a closed set that’s not compromised by the presence outside community members. It’s also best to assume that certain kinds of public spaces are going to be a lot harder to secure, as people are going to be more hesitant about letting film crews invade their space.

DISTANT vs. LOCAL

On thesis films, we do allow shows to make requests to shoot at distant locations. There’s already an approval process for this, in which the show needs to argue why it is vital to shoot out of town and what the practical plan is. There will be an additional burden of responsibility during the pandemic to outline a robust safety plan too. And wanting to shoot in a COVID hotspot is certainly going to be less viable than, say, shooting in a remote location in the mountains.

CHARACTERS

QUANTITY OF CHARACTERS

Scenes with large quantities of characters (or extras) are generally going to have more safety concerns than scenes with small numbers of characters. As you write, it’s good to ask yourself whether you need that big party scene, or whether you can scale down the scope of it. If you do really need it, how will you shoot it safely?

AGE OF CHARACTERS

We need to be vigilant about protecting the health of all of the performers, but we also know that fatality rates for COVID-19 are higher among older demographics. Scenes involving older characters, therefore, are generally going to raise additional safety concerns. Be mindful of other COVID-19 risk-factors too as you write, especially if your choices about yours characters require actors who might fall in other groups with elevated risk (e.g., weakened immune systems, pulmonary disease, cancer, diabetes, sickle cell disease, obesity, pregnancy, etc.)

PROXIMITY OF CHARACTERS

Scenes with physical intimacy between actors will need special care and preparation. If it’s essential to the story, how much can you minimize it or cheat it, in order to best protect your actors on set? Would the scene still play well if the action was staged without the need for physical proximity?

ACTIONS IN THE SCENE

Certain types of actions in a scene are going raise more safety concerns than other types of actions. If the actions require actors to shout, cough, spit, or breathe heavily (e.g., due to stunts or other acts of physical exertion), those moments will require a robust plan for how to shoot it safely.

PRODUCTION SCOPE

It’s also a good idea to be mindful of overall production scope as you write, because there will inevitably be some slow down during production in order to observe safety protocols. The more out-of-scope a production is, the more likelihood there will be of either: (a) not making your day; or (b) compromising safety by rushing too much. You’ll all be less nimble if you have to adapt to any surprises. To anticipate this, a few good questions to ask yourself as you write are:

  • Will the scene require extensive art department work?
  • Will the scene require extensive grip/gaff work?
  • Will the scene require extensive coverage/set-ups?

COVID-19 Script Breakdowns

Instructions

Having a smart plan for production in the COVID era starts with writing and development. You can reduce many risk factors simply by being mindful of what will be required to actually shoot the words on the page. Performing script breakdowns to identify potential safety concerns will be an essential part of this process.

BREAKDOWN EACH SCENE

Starting with the first draft of the script, answer the following questions for each scene, using the above document as a template:

  1. Is the location interior or exterior?
  2. Is the location a large/open space or a cramped/closed space?
  3. Is the location public or private?
  4. How many characters/extras are in the scene?
  5. Will the scene require actors in at-risk groups (e.g., older actors)?
  6. Are any characters in close physical proximity?
  7. Do any actions require shouting, coughing, singing, or physical exertion
  8. Will the scene require extensive art department, grip/gaff, or coverage?

ASSESS THE SAFETY CONCERNS

Using tips for writing during a pandemic as a guide, assess the level of COVID-19 safety concerns for each answer of the breakdown and then change the color of the answer according to the following criteria:

GREEN – Standard level of COVID-19 safety concerns

YELLOW – Warning of possibly elevated COVID-19 concerns

RED – Alert of definitely elevated COVID-19 concerns

SAMPLE BREAKDOWN

Crew Drills (BTH) – Fall 2020

The purpose of the crew drills is to practice working in each of the crew positions. Don’t get too caught up on trying to make the “perfect” scene. Keep it really simple. BFA3 department heads mentor those in their department, as follows:

  • 1st AD mentors both 2nd ADs
  • 1st AC mentors both 2nd ACs
  • Key Grip mentors both BBGs

Food will not be provided, so make sure you plan accordingly. You have a 1-hour lunch break, so either bring your own lunch or plan to go out nearby. Just make sure you’re back in time.

Crew drills will take place on the set in Stage A.

Crewing

BFA3 will complete the Crew Drill grid together as a class. There are 8 BFA3 positions for each drill. This will give each of you an opportunity to mentor the BFA2 and get to know them better. This also gives you a chance to get your hands on the gear again to reignite that muscle memory.

BFA2 will work the 3 positions (2D, 2C, BG) in pairs. One of the 2Ds and one of the 2Cs will start off as Actors for the first half of the drill. Then they will swap, and the other 2D & 2C will be the Actors. The BGs will remain working in pairs during the entire drill.

Production

The production will have 2.5 hours to unload the van, block, rehearse, build, shoot, and wrap.

Plan on having 6 total setups. Once you have shot the first 3 setups with the first 2D/2C Actors, swap them with the other 2D/2C Actors. Have the Director modify the blocking, the 2C lay down new marks, and then reshoot the scene with the other 3 setups.

  • 1st New Deal 0:10
  • Camera on set 0:30
  • Lighting complete 0:40
  • Start Shooting 0:45
  • Swap Actors with other 2D/2C pair 1:10
  • 2nd New Deal 1:20
  • Camera Wrap 2:00
  • Company Wrap 2:30

Crew responsibilities

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Director

Before the Drill

  • You will use a scene (or part of a scene) from your BTH script for this crew drill. The script must meet the following criteria (make up a crew drill version if necessary):
    • Must be no less than 1 full page, and no more than 1 4/8 pages in length
    • Must only have 2 characters (no more, no less)
    • Must have dialog (so the Sound Mixer can practice recording it)
    • Keep it simple (no stunts, close proximity, weapons, complicated SFX, etc.)
  • The cast will consist of one of the 2D and 2C pairs, then they’ll swap half way through.
  • Discuss the shot design with the DP.

During the Drill

  • At the beginning of the shift, briefly block with the Actors on the set (keep it really simple).
  • During the New Deal, have the Actors demonstrate the blocking for the crew.
  • Direct the Actors in the scene.
  • Once you have shot the first 3 setups with the first 2D/2C Actors, swap them with the other 2D/2C Actors. Modify the blocking with them, then reshoot the scene with the other 3 setups.
Production Designer

Before the Drill

  • Discuss the production design with the Director (keep it simple).
  • Acquire props, wardrobe, etc (only if absolutely necessary).

During the Drill

  • Dress the set, provide props & wardrobe only if necessary.
Director of Photography

Before the Drill

  • Discuss the shot design with the Director.
  • Create a simple Setup Schedule with 3 setups for each of the 2D/2C Actor pairs, for a total of 6 setups. For example:
    • 1st 2D/2C Actor Pair: 3 setups (1 master + 2 singles)
    • 2nd 2D/2C Actor Pair: 3 setups (1 master + 2 singles)

During the Drill

  • Communicate the setups to the crew.
  • Manage the Camera, Grip & Electric Departments.
  • Once you have shot the first 3 setups with the first 2D/2C Actors, swap them with the other 2D/2C Actors. Have the Director modify the blocking, the 2C lay down new marks, and then reshoot the scene with the other 3 setups.
1st Assistant Director

Before the Drill

  • Get a copy of the Setup Schedule from the DP.

During the Drill

  • At call time, have a Safety Meeting with the entire crew to communicate an emergency plan, location hazards and any production safety concerns. Complete the Safety Meeting Report
  • Get the DR to quickly show the Actors the blocking, while the 2C lays down marks, then call a New Deal.
  • Run the set, making sure the crew is working safely and efficiently.
  • Keep track of your time using the Setup Schedule.
  • Once you have shot the first 3 setups with the first 2D/2C Actors, swap them with the other 2D/2C Actors. Have the Director modify the blocking, the 2C lay down new marks, then call a New Deal
  • Reshoot the scene with the remaining 3 setups.
2nd Assistant Director

During the Drill

  • At the beginning of the shift:
    • Take forehead temperature of each crew member.
    • Have crew sign in using the iPad timeclock.
    • Hand out walkies to department heads.
  • During the shift:
    • Remain in Green Room with the Actors, except to escort them to/from set at 1st AD’s request.
    • During a setup, remain outside the stage doors to make sure no one enters during a take.
  • At the end of the shift:
    • Complete the Performers Production Time Report. Have the Actors sign it.
    • Have crew sign out using the iPad timeclock.
    • Collect walkies and put them back on charger.
All Other BTL

During the Drill

  • Work with BFA3 mentors in your assigned positions.
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VFX Scope Checks

During the development process of the F3, BTH and MTH cycles, there are a series of VFX scope checks, to make sure that shows are not writing checks that cannot be cashed. The Head of Visual Effects sends out a survey near the start of development to assess how many shows are considering visual effects. In-person meetings follow for shows that are considering visual effects. Near the end of the development phase, as shows enter pre-production, proof-of-concept meetings take place, wherein students show tests to demonstrate how they plan to execute any planned visual effects.

Director’s Prep (BTH)

Before the prep day:

No later than noon on the day before the prep, the Producer is responsible for sending a clean copy of the script (with scene numbers) in PDF format to each member of the faculty thesis committee.

On the prep day:

In order to go as paperless as possible, everything except the screenplay will be presented digitally on the classroom monitor. Be sure to download any materials to the desktop computer for presentation.

Hard copies of the screenplay — with title page, scene numbers and lined script — will be handed out at the beginning of prep to each member of the faculty thesis committee.

If there are any VFX shots or if a camera other than the primary assigned thesis camera is planned to be employed in the production then the hard copy signed VFX approval forms must be shown to the Thesis supervisor.

The presentation will include:

  1. The Producer’s visual presentation file
  2. The Director’s visual presentation file
  3. The Director of Photography’s visual presentation file
  4. The Production Designers’ visual presentation file
  5. The screenplay with scene numbers and the beat-by-beat breakdown
  6. The UPM breakdown script
  7. The production board (header board and a strip for each scene in shooting order)
  8. The shooting schedule

In addition to the above requirements the Cinematography, Editing and Production Design faculty may require additional items in either electronic or hard copy form. Please see those faculty members for additional requirements.

Be sure that all above requirements are ready and provided to the appropriate faculty members at the time the prep is scheduled to begin.

Director’s Prep will occur in four separate sections and in the following order:

  1. Presentation of the movie.
  2. Faculty Q&A.
  3. Presentation and discussion of storyboards.
  4. Creation of an action plan.

The producer, director, production designer, cinematographer and 1st A.D. must attend the prep. (The production team may determine that the attendance of other crewmembers is necessary, and may invite them to prep as needed.)

Section I — Presentation of the Movie

The purpose of this section is to give the thesis film’s producer, director, production designer and cinematographer an opportunity to present the film to the faculty – uninterrupted. We will start the prep with the director addressing any notes addressed or not addressed after concept prep. After that, both cinematographer and production designer will do their presentations.

Let images speak for themselves in both cases.

Address the Cassavetes experience, and also if any information regarding the crew drills exercises: please share with us any findings, what you learned.

Producer will do the final presentation, showing the temp strip board and a brief resume of it.

Students will make presentations to the faculty in the following order:

1. The Producer will introduce the title of the film, and the crew positions held by every student in Director’s Prep. This should be done quickly, and without formality; it’s intended to give the faculty an orientation to who is doing what.

2. The Director will present a outcomes of concept prep, and what has changed/has been achieved. Then a quick visual pitch of the story to the faculty. The Pitch should be in story order and be supported by visual slide, which illustrate the essence of the directors vision for each moment of the pitch. The director will also present their casting choices, with audition videos ideally, exercise and only as last resource with stills.

Remember that these are images that you have found and or created for visually illustrating your pitch of the story. The images are meant be representational of “key story beats” to illustrate and evoke the feeling of the moment in your story.

The most important thing is that you TELL the story as a storytelling, using the images as background support for your PITCH.

3. The Production Designer will continue to present a brief visual illustration of the major design aspects as it relates to the world and characters of the film.

The presentation will begin with the world in which the story takes place. The presentation should include:

  • Photos representing the locale of the story.
  • Photos of every actual location the action will occur.
  • Photos of any key elements (such as picture vehicles).

After locations, the Production Designer will present photos and/or actual examples of key props/set dressings and the wardrobe for the main characters, with a focus on how the wardrobe helps illustrate the history, emotional construction and objectives of each main character. The presentation should include:

  • Photos or illustrations of the characters wardrobe/hair/makeup.
  • Any particularly relevant props and/or set dressing.

The Production Designer’s presentation should emphasize how the design of the world will illustrate – or serve – the overall expression of the story and its main characters (who they are and what they want).

4. The Cinematographer will present a three-to-four minute illustration of the “Cinematographic Plan” of the film. To show found and/or created photos and videos (including the Cassavetes workshop scene), the Cinematographer will demonstrate how color, light, shadow and visual language will illustrate the story. The presentation should include:

  • Visual References: Present an illustration of the visual plan for the film. You may also include movie clips (website link), paintings, stills, artwork, AC articles, anything that visually echoes the story’s look/visual mood. These references should reflect lighting ideas, contrast ratios, color, camera movement and shot design.
  • Mood: In writing, identify the emotional intent of the film and be prepared to explain the visual elements you plan on incorporating in your cinematography that support the emotional intent of the director. Describe any changes in mood and how you plan to support, enhance, underscore visually.
  • Format: Please describe your format choice/s. Please delineate your reasons behind each format choice. This applies to both framing formats (16×9(spherical), 2.4:1(widescreen) and digital capture formats (4k, 2k, DSLR, RED Lake, Etc.). Note any camera systems utilized other than RED should be a colored storyboard to indicate VFX and be prepared to discuss the story-based reasonings of this additional camera system.
  • Color Temperature Plan: Describe all the different lighting environments and the scene(s) that are set within that environment. For each of these major environments, write a brief description of how you plan to balance the scene/sequence’s color temperature.
  • Exposure/Filtration Plan: Outline a general exposure plan for each major lighting environment within you story. Note proposed shooting stops, expected footcandle readings at middle grey, expected ISO setting and contrast ratios you are aiming for associated with each environment. Also indicate any filtration you intend to use and the reasons why.
  • Specific Production Challenges: Describe any major lighting, rigging, power, location and/or camera challenges that need larger development and be prepared to explain how you propose to overcome these challenges.

5. The Producer will return with a three-minute presentation going through the Production board scene by scene in shooting order with the planned CALL and WRAP times for each shooting day including the plan for the use of any overtime.

As the producer goes through each day they should discuss all pre- production accomplishments and challenges related to each scene, with a plan for how the team will meet each challenge.

The Producer should focus on all concerns that any objective person would have about the production (e.g., a difficult location, an exotic animal, a dangerous activity, etc.). The goal is to anticipate the faculty’s concerns and address them before the Q&A begins.

Section II – Faculty Q&A

Faculty will ask students questions related to the presentation of the film in Section I. Students must be prepared to address in detail every story, script and production concern the faculty may have. The First Assistant Director will take notes during this section, making certain to document every faculty concern and related resolutions. It is important that the 1st A.D. has a complete understanding of any and all topics of discussion (the production team will rely on the 1st AD’s notes to address concerns after Director’s Prep). So the 1st AD should be prepared to stop the Q&A at any time for clarification.

This section will take as long as necessary for the faculty to have a complete understanding of the story, screenplay and production. (The directing faculty member will watch time and make certain to end this session with enough time to accomplish the next section.)

Section III – Presentation and Discussion of Storyboards

The purpose of this section is to give the director an opportunity to present the film to the faculty – frame-by-frame. Storyboards will be presented as a visual representation of how the film will play when it’s completed (e.g., the first storyboard should be the first image in the completed film), and SHOULD NOT be presented as a representation of coverage.

Directors will present storyboards one scene at a time – uninterrupted – describing the action and dialogue that happens in each frame. After each scene, faculty will ask questions and raise concerns. All other production members should be prepared to participate in the answers to the faculty’s questions. Directors will continue to the next scene only after all of the faculty’s questions/concerns have been addressed.

Any storyboard that depicts a camera angle that is intended to be shot as a visual effect, or is intended to be shot with a camera that is different from the primary thesis camera issued, must be either scanned from a yellow page or paper or have a large yellow banner applied under it in the Prezi.

The First Assistant Director will take notes during this section, making certain to document every faculty concern and related resolutions. It is important that the 1st A.D. has a complete understanding of any and all topics of discussion (the production team will rely on the 1st AD’s notes to address concerns after Director’s Prep). So the 1st AD should be prepared to stop the Q&A at any time for clarification.

Section IV – Creation of an Action Plan

The 1st Assistant Director will review with faculty and students every problem identified during prep. Together, faculty and students will determine who will be responsible for solving each problem before production begins. The 1st AD will create a list of these problems and responsible persons, which will become the “Action Plan.” Before the end of the day, the 1st AD will email the film’s Action Plan to each member of the faculty participating in the Director’s Prep. In the days following Director’s Prep, everyone will work to complete the Action Plan.

Prior to the first day of production, the 1st AD will email the completed Action Plan to the faculty, with a description of the resolution(s) for each problem identified.

If the action plan is not complete and submitted 12 hours before the first shooting day’s call time then the show will be penalized by the reduction of some or all of the shows overtime/PU days/special equipment privileges to be determined by the faculty production supervisor.

Concept Prep (BTH)

Presentation

This is the opportunity for the directors to share their vision, and for the producers to share their plan with the Thesis Faculty. This whole section should last no more than 15 minutes.

  1. Director will Pitch the current story to Faculty that have read the script. Please be concise and to the point. What is this film about? A 5 minute retelling of the script is not a pitch.
  2. Director will show the BEST take of the top two actors that you are considering for the LEAD Roles of the film. If you are able to, show rehearsals, or something that gives us more insight.
  3. The Director will show images of actual locations, which demonstrate the WORLD of the film.
  4. The Director will Show lighting examples which illustrate the overall MOOD of the film.
  5. The Producer will give a logistics status report and summarize the overall Production Plan. This is an important part of the prep, so please do address problems and solutions.

Discussion

Finally, the team should be prepared to answer any questions related to these items. We shall start asking any questions about story, and after that we shall move ahead with actors, questions about images, and so forth. Of course sometimes are all intertwined, but after the presentation we will start with questions about story.