Uncategorized

BTH Specs

SinglesDoublesAnimation

Writing specs

Page count:7 pages
Quantity of locations:No restrictions — but be mindful that no more than 3 filming locations will typically be approved during production, to avoid company moves during the pandemic
Quantity of characters:No restrictions
Children:Yes
Animals:Yes
Weapons:Yes
Sexual intimacy:Yes – but an intimacy coordinator may be required for certain scenes
COVID restrictions:No blanket restrictions on writing, but be mindful of tips for writing during a pandemic and a COVID script breakdown will be required on an early draft to anticipate safety concerns.

Production specs

Locations per day:1 location
Distance to location:May shoot outside of the studio zone with approval of a distant location request.
Shooting days:3 days with full crew or 4 days with reduced crew
Pick-up days:May make a pick-up photography request for one half-day of additional shooting
Length of workday:12 hours, plus an hour for lunch
Call time restrictions:No time restrictions, except for allowing 10-hour turnaround
Night shoots:No
FIST agreement:Yes
COVID protocols:Yes

Data allocation

Final page count:7 pages
Shooting days:3 days (shows with full crew)
4 days (shows with reduced crew)
Pages per day:2 3/8 pages (full crew)
1 6/8 pages (reduced crew)
Shooting ratio:20:1
Data rate:2.6 GB/minute
Max. data per page:52 GB
Max. data per day:121 GB (full crew)
91 GB (reduced crew)
Max. dailies length:47 minutes (full crew)
35 minutes (reduced crew)

Capture settings

Frame rate:24.000 fps
Record file format:ProRes 4444 HQ
Resolution:2K (2048×1080)
Video codec:ProRes 4444 HQ
Baked-in settings:All image settings (Rec. 709 / SDR)
Mode:IPP2
Output color space:Rec. 709
Output tone map:Medium Contrast
Highlight roll-off:Medium

Picture Edit specs

Pic edit software:Premiere Pro
Pic edit days:11 days
Max. story content:7:30
Max. credits:1:08
Max. TRT:8:38

Sound specs

Sound software:ProTools
Sound design days:11 days
Sound mix days:0.5 days

Visual Effects specs

VFX software:Variable
VFX days:Variable

Coloring specs

Coloring software:DaVinci Resolve
Coloring days:2 days

Writing specs

Page count:12 pages
Quantity of locations:No restrictions — but be mindful that no more than 6 filming locations will typically be approved during production, to avoid company moves during the pandemic
Quantity of characters:No restrictions
Children:Yes
Animals:Yes
Weapons:Yes
Sexual intimacy:Yes – but an intimacy coordinator may be required for certain scenes
COVID restrictions:No blanket restrictions on writing, but be mindful of tips for writing during a pandemic and a COVID script breakdown will be required on an early draft to anticipate safety concerns.

Production specs

Locations per day:1 location
Distance to location:May shoot outside of the studio zone with approval of a distant location request.
Shooting days:6 days with full crew or 8 days with reduced crew
Pick-up days:May make a pick-up photography request for one half-day of additional shooting
Length of workday:12 hours, plus an hour for lunch
Call time restrictions:No time restrictions, except for allowing 10-hour turnaround
Night shoots:No
FIST agreement:Yes
COVID protocols:Yes

Data allocation

Final page count:12 pages
Shooting days:6 days (shows with full crew)
8 days (shows with reduced crew)
Pages per day:2 pages (full crew)
1 4/8 pages (reduced crew)
Shooting ratio:20:1
Data rate:2.4 GB/minute
Max. data per page:48 GB
Max. data per day:96 GB (full crew)
72 GB (reduced crew)
Max. dailies length:40 minutes (full crew)
30 minutes (reduced crew)

Capture settings

Frame rate:24.000 fps
Record file format:ProRes 4444 HQ
Resolution:2K (2048×1080)
Video codec:ProRes 4444 HQ
Baked-in settings:All image settings (Rec. 709 / SDR)
Mode:IPP2
Output color space:Rec. 709
Output tone map:Medium Contrast
Highlight roll-off:Medium

Picture Edit specs

Pic edit software:Premiere Pro
Pic edit days:14 days
Max. story content:12:30
Max. credits:1:08
Max. TRT:13:38

Sound specs

Sound software:ProTools
Sound design days:11 days
Sound mix days:1 day

Visual Effects specs

VFX software:Variable
VFX days:Variable

Coloring specs

Coloring software:DaVinci Resolve
Coloring days:2 days

Project Specs

Page count:1.5 pages
Previz duration:72 seconds
Max. number of assets:12 assets per artist
Max. number of characters:3 character
Max. number of shots:24 shots
Max. seconds of motion:90 seconds
Final content duration:90 seconds
Credits duration:68 seconds
Final TRT:158 seconds

Sound specs

Sound software:ProTools
Sound design days:11 days
Sound mix days:0.5 day

Coloring specs

Coloring software:DaVinci Resolve
Coloring days:2 days

F3 Specs

Live ActionAnimation

Writing specs

Page count:6 pages
Quantity of locations:As you write, plan for shooting at no more than two physical locations (one per shooting day).
Quantity of characters:No restrictions, but but be mindful of COVID safety concerns for actors.
Children:Yes
Animals:Yes
Weapons:Yes
Visual effects:Yes – but be mindful that there will only be a couple of weeks for visual effects in the schedule, so keep the scope in check.
Sexual intimacy:Yes – but an intimacy coordinator may be required for certain scenes.
COVID restrictions:No blanket restrictions on writing, but be mindful of tips for writing during a pandemic and a COVID script breakdown will be required on an early draft to anticipate safety concerns.

Production specs

Locations per day:1 location per day
Distance to locations:Must be within the studio zone
Shooting days:2 days
Pick-up days:No
Length of workday:12 hours, plus an hour for lunch
Earliest call time:6:00AM
Latest wrap time:12:00PM
FIST agreement:Yes
COVID protocols:Yes

Data allocation

Final page count:6 pages
Shooting days:2 days
Pages per day:3 pages
Shooting ratio:20:1
Max. dailies per day:60 minutes
Data rate:2.6 GB/minute
Max. data per page:52 GB
Max. data per day:156 GB
Max dailies length 120 minutes
Max dailies size312 GB

Capture settings

Camera package:RED
Frame rate:24.000 fps
Record file format:ProRes 4444 HQ
Resolution:2K (2048×1080)
Video codec:ProRes 4444 HQ
Baked-in settings:All image settings (Rec. 709 / SDR)
Mode:IPP2
Output color space:Rec. 709
Output tone map:Medium Contrast
Highlight roll-off:Medium

Picture Edit specs

Pic edit location:Post Hall
Pic edit software:Media Composer
Pic edit days:7 days
Max. story content:6:30
Max. credits:1:00
Max. TRT:7:30

Sound specs

Sound design location:Post Hall
Sound design software:ProTools
Sound design days:7 days
Sound mix:3 hours

Visual Effects specs

VFX software:Variable
VFX days:Variable — with a maximum of two weeks for each show

Coloring specs

Coloring software:DaVinci Resolve
Coloring days:1 day

Project Specs

Page count:0.5 page
Previz duration:24 seconds
Max. number of assets:4 assets
Max. number of characters:1 character
Max. number of shots:16 shots
Max. seconds of motion:30 seconds
Final content duration:30 seconds
Credits duration:30 seconds
Final TRT:60 seconds

Production Schedule

Development8 weeks
Previz6 weeks
Model3 weeks
Texture1 week
Animate4 weeks
Light2 weeks
Render2 weeks
Comp1 week
CBB1 week
Sound Design1 week
Sound Mix3 hours
–>

MTH Specs

Writing specs

Page count:12 pages
Quantity of locations:No restrictions — but be mindful that no more than 7 filming locations will be approved during production, to avoid company moves during the pandemic
Quantity of characters:No restrictions
Children:Yes
Animals:Yes
Weapons:Yes
Sexual intimacy:Yes – but an intimacy coordinator may be required for certain scenes
COVID restrictions:No blanket restrictions on writing, but be mindful of tips for writing during a pandemic and a COVID script breakdown will be required on an early draft to anticipate safety concerns.

Production specs

Locations per day:1 location
Distance to location:May shoot outside of the studio zone with approval of a distant location request.
Shooting days:7 days
Pick-up days:May make a pick-up photography request for one half-day of additional shooting
Length of workday:12 hours, plus an hour for lunch
Call time restrictions:No time restrictions, except for allowing 10-hour turnaround
Night shoots:Yes
FIST agreement:Yes
COVID protocols:Yes

Data allocation

Final page count:12 pages
Shooting days:7 days
Pages per day:1 6/8 pages
Shooting ratio:20:1
Data rate:2.6 GB/minute
Max. data per page:52 GB
Max. data per day:89 GB
Max. dailies length:240 minutes
Max. dailies size:624 GB

Capture settings

Frame rate:24.000 fps
Record file format:ProRes 4444 HQ
Resolution:2K (2048×1080)
Video codec:ProRes 4444 HQ
Baked-in settings:All image settings (Rec. 709 / SDR)
Mode:IPP2
Output color space:Rec. 709
Output tone map:Medium Contrast
Highlight roll-off:Medium

Picture Edit specs

Pic edit software:Media Composer
Pic edit days:5 days for first cut
10 days for final cut
Max. story content:12:30
Max. credits:1:00
Max. TRT:13:30

Sound specs

Sound software:ProTools
Sound design days:10 days
Sound mix days:2 days

Visual Effects specs

VFX software:Variable
VFX days:Variable; no more than 8 weeks is available for any given artists

Coloring specs

Coloring software:DaVinci Resolve
Coloring days:2 days

Delivery Test

The following is a list of items students must deliver to the Head of Production via the production’s OneDrive folder. Submit one electronic version (either scanned PDF or electronic original) of all documents using the provided folder structure. Name files according to the naming conventions provided in each section (e.g. 01d1-Script.pdf).

Always keep a backup copy and/or hard copy of all files in a production delivery binder in case a delivered file becomes corrupt or accidentally deleted.

Due Dates

Part I – Production Delivery

  • To be completed by the Producer by 9:00am on the Thursday following production

Part II – Post Production Delivery

  • To be completed by the Producer by 5:00pm on Wednesday, December 9, 2020

Part I – Production Delivery

01. Script

PDF file of the final shooting script01d1-Script.pdf
Final Draft file of the final shooting script01d1-Script.fdx

02. Production Schedule

PDF of Shooting Schedule from Scenechronize01d1-ShootingSchedule.pdf
PDF of Vertical Stripboard Report from Scenechronize01d1-Stripboard.pdf

03. Daily Production Paperwork

Call Sheet (including Safety Bulletins and Maps)01d1-CallSheet-Day1.pdf
Daily Production Report01d1-DPR-Day1.pdf
Meal Sign-In Sheet01d1-MealSignIn-Day1.pdf
Performers Production Time Report01d1-PerformerTimeReport-Day1.pdf
Safety Meeting Report01d1-SafetyReport-Day1.pdf
Set-up Schedule01d1-SetupSchedule-Day1.pdf
Camera Reports01d1-CameraReports-Day1.pdf
Sound Reports01d1-SoundReports-Day1.csv
SS-Clip Log01d1-ClipLog-Day1.pdf
SS-Editor’s Log01d1-EditorsLog-Day1.pdf
SS-Facing Pages01d1-FacingPages.pdf
SS-Lined Script01d1-LinedScript.pdf
SS-Progress Report01d1-ProgressReport-Day1.pdf

04. Releases

Crew Deal Memos01d1-CrewDealMemos.pdf
Cast Performance Agreements01d1-PerformanceAgreements.pdf
Location Agreement & Shooting Plans01d1-LocationAgreements.pdf
Location Hazard Assessment Checklist01d1-LocationHazards.pdf
Hazard Notification Report01d1-HazardNotification.pdf
Picture Vehicle Agreements01d1-PictureVehicleAgreements.pdf

05. Correspondence

PDFs of all general correspondence, including letters, emails, texts, etc. At the very least, this should include a thank-you letter to each location.01d1-Correspondence.pdf

06. Crew Information

Update the Crew tab in Motion with any additional crew members (e.g. volunteers). Save a PDF of the crew list and include it in this section.01d1-Crew.pdf
A good, clear, scanned copy of the Director’s student ID card01d1-DirectorID.pdf
A good, clear, scanned copy of the Producer’s student ID card01d1-ProducerID.pdf

07. Cast Information

Update the Cast tab in Motion with info for every person who appears on screen. Include a headshot for all lead and supporting roles (headshot not needed for featured or background extras). Save a PDF of the cast list and include it in this section.01d1-Cast.pdf

08. Location Info

Update the Locations tab in Motion with info and photo for each location used during production. Save a PDF of the location list and include it in this section.01d1-LocationList.pdf

09. Vendors

Update the Vendors tab in Motion with info on each business or individual from whom items were borrowed, rented or donated. Include in the Keywords a brief description of the items (for donations, also include the real or estimated value of the donation). Save a PDF of the Vendors list, and include it in this section. If there were none, then still include a PDF of the Vendors tab from Motion.01d1-Vendors.pdf

Part II – Post-Production Delivery

01. Project Details

Update all info in the Details tab in Motion. Save a PDF of the Details tab and include it in this section.01d1-ProjectDetails.pdf

02. Dialogue List

Dialogue List01d1-DialogueList.pdf

03. Music Requirements

Music Cue Sheet01d1-MusicCueSheet.pdf
Killer Tracks License01d1-KillerTracks.pdf
Composer Contract01d1-ComposerRelease-ComposerName.pdf
Synchronization License01d1-SyncLicense-SongName.pdf
Master Use License 01d1-MasterLicense-SongName.pdf

04. Credits & Title Cards

PDF of Credits List form. Include title cards & credits as they appear on screen. This should be a typed list, not screenshots of the credits from the film.01d1-Credits.pdf

05. Media

Update the Media tab in Motion with at least five Production Stills (72dpi, jpg). Include a PDF of the Media tab in this section.01d1-Media.pdf

RF Transmitters

Safety Bulletin

Guidelines

These guidelines are intended to help cast and crew understand radio frequency exposure for equipment that is commonly used by production. RF radiation can be harmful due to the ability of RF energy to heat biological tissue faster than the body can cope with or dissipate the excessive heat. It is not presently known whether there are non-heat related effects of RF exposure.

COMMON SOURCES OF RADIOFREQUENCY

RF is continuously emitted from certain types of wireless transmitting equipment that is commonly used on cameras, audio equipment, wireless lighting controllers, and Wi-Fi hotspots. Equipment that only receives RF is not a source of RF emissions.

This bulletin is not meant to address radio transmitting facilities, satellite antenna farms, microwave installations, cellular telephone towers, and other industrial equipment that may emit radio waves. Individuals working in these areas should follow all warning signage and comply with the facility’s safety protocols and procedures.

The FCC recognizes two tiers of Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) limits. This bulletin follows the stricter limits of the General Population/Uncontrolled Exposure (GP/UE) guidelines.

CONSIDERATIONS FOR USE

  1. Follow the manufacturer’s guidelines. Camera-back transmitters commonly used in the film and television industry are authorized for license-free use by the Federal Communications Committee (FCC) under Part 15 and require that all Part 15 devices be subject to FCC RF exposure guidelines.
  2. Unless it is permissible by the manufacturer, the RF equipment should not be modified in any way. Equipment exceeding FCC unlicensed power limits or otherwise requiring a Special Temporary Authorization (STA) from the FCC should be used only by trained technicians in accordance with the FCC license. If equipment that exceeds FCC unlicensed power limits must be used, production personnel should be made aware so that the required additional safety protocols and precautions can be implemented.
  3. Be aware of the RF output power and minimum safe operating distances from the transmitting source, i.e. antenna. Antennas may be supported by a mast that provides distance from the transmitter. These masts are not an active RF source.
  4. Establish operating procedures that enable personnel using RF Equipment to remain at safe operating distances or provide other means of protection from excessive RF exposure.

GUIDELINES FOR SAFE OPERATION

Methods for mitigating the health effects of RF exposure include:

  1. Hardwiring the equipment
  2. Increasing one’s distance from the RF emitting device
  3. Employing RF shielding or protective clothing

Related Bulletins

Free Driving

Safety Bulletin

Guidelines

The term “Free Driving” applies to situations where the driver or a passenger of a vehicle is being photographed by cameras attached to the outside and/or inside the vehicle, or being handheld by a camera operator inside the vehicle. The term free driving also applies in situations when the camera is used to film external shots from in or on the vehicle. For example, during Free Driving the camera can be attached to the exterior of a vehicle with a door mount (hostess tray), a hood mount, or on a mechanical track system. As a result of unique vehicle configurations, equipment placement, personnel location and operations, potential risk factors may exist and should be addressed, as discussed below.

These guidelines do not cover insert car and/or process trailer operations. For those situations, refer to Industry-Wide Labor-Management Safety Committee Safety Bulletin #8 “Guidelines for Traditional Camera Cars” and/or #8, Addendum A “Process Trailer/Towed Vehicle” for guidance. Also refer to Safety Bulletin #37 “Vehicle Restraint Systems – Seat Belts & Harnesses” and #42 “Guidelines for Alternative Driving Systems”.

Considerations Before Engaging in Free Driving

Production shall consider all available options (including camera car, process trailer, alternative driving systems, etc.) and assess and make the determination that Free Driving is an appropriate method.

Driving safely is the first priority; acting and/or getting the shot is second. When safe operation of the vehicle is not possible, alternate means should be used, such as a process trailer or a tow vehicle.

Unsecured equipment poses a particular challenge. Hand-held cameras, equipment, and crew and actor placement should be considered to ensure the equipment will not become a projectile that could cause injury.

Other considerations for safe Free Driving include:

  • Scene action (e.g. stunts, performance, and special effects)
  • The ability of the driver to simultaneously perform, drive, and remain aware of any clearance required for rigging or equipment that extends beyond the vehicle body
  • Controlled or uncontrolled environment (closed course versus open roads with Intermittent Traffic Control (ITC))
  • Location permitting requirements, such as for road closures, ITC or driving grids.
  • Type and condition of vehicle to be used
  • Intended speed and maneuvers
  • Operating the vehicle in close proximity to other vehicles
  • Route conditions (e.g. curved, incline, crown, obstacles, clearances, length, width, paved, gravel, dirt, flat, hilly, wet, or slippery)
  • Anticipated weather
  • Airbags and other automatic devices may need to be deactivated for safety, depending on the placement of personnel and equipment (e.g. cameras, lights). NOTE: Only a person who is trained, qualified, and authorized to disengage an airbag shall do so.
  • If airbags must be disabled, alternative safety measures will need to be implemented (e.g. restraint harnesses).
  • The production should consider road closures, reduced speeds, etc. prior to disengaging airbags.
  • Equipment weight, load capacity, center of gravity, counter balance, placement and use (e.g. camera, lighting, and props)
  • Limited lighting options, including placement and power
  • Limited visibility conditions for the driver (e.g. cameras, mounts, dust, spray, lights, restrictive covering over the windshield, smoke)
  • Communication system (e.g. walkie-talkies)

Prior to Operation

  • When vehicles are used for filming, all rigged equipment must be securely mounted. If cameras are mounted to any part of the vehicle (either inside or out), these must be securely installed with the appropriate mounts / restraints and by a member of the crew who is qualified to perform the procedure.
  • Mounted equipment inside or outside the vehicle should not obstruct the driver’s view or distract attention while the vehicle is in motion.
  • No lighting should be used within the vehicle that could impair the driver’s clarity of vision or provide distraction.
  • The consideration of foreseeable emergencies (e.g. deployment of vehicle airbags) must be taken into account when positioning the camera operator.
  • The driver must be qualified to operate the vehicle and should have an appropriate license. NOTE: A license may not be required by law. However, drivers may need special training to be qualified to drive an unfamiliar vehicle or course.
  • All rigging of the vehicle and equipment, including cameras and lights, is to be performed by qualified personnel in a secure area which is free of known hazards, including other vehicular traffic.
  • A walk-through with the driver should be conducted to familiarize them with the operational characteristics of the vehicle and controls. Always check that the driver can operate the vehicle safely while filming is taking place.
  • Establish communication between drivers and support vehicles (e.g. walkie-talkies).
  • Check the weather and road conditions; establish the route, ensure that it is clear, and allow enough time for rehearsals prior to filming.
  • Brief the driver regarding the proposed filming plans. Ensure that the driver is confident with the route and is aware of where the cameras will be positioned.
  • The driver should do a test drive of the vehicle to familiarize themself with the filming plans and where they need to drive during the scene.
  • After rigging cameras and other equipment, carry out a test drive in a secluded spot or private road to test that the clamps have not come loose through vibrations. This process should be carried out each time you stop as a secondary check.

Inspection

Ensure the vehicle has been inspected, is roadworthy, and has been suitably maintained. Inspection items include, but are not limited to, brakes, steering, tires, engine, drive train, vehicle’s electrical system, connection points, equipment placement, and all safety equipment. Any items not functioning properly must be repaired by a qualified person before use.

Safety Meetings

A shot‐specific safety meeting should be held by the First Assistant Director for all personnel riding in or on the vehicle, including those in close proximity (e.g. stunt personnel or background performers). This meeting should discuss the following topics:

  • Shot sequence and route (e.g. stunt action including crossovers/head‐on or near misses, vehicle speed, number and proximity of other vehicles, crew and camera placement, background performers, and property)
  • The potential use of a convoy of safety buffer vehicles for a cushion zone, plus slower travel speeds
  • Walk‐through or dry‐run
  • Environmental conditions (e.g. weather, surface conditions such as cement, gravel or dirt, topography such as flat or hilly)
  • Possible changes due to hazards
  • Authority to abort, including signals to be used
  • Route conditions (e.g. slope, curved, incline, crown, obstacles, clearances, length and width)
  • Equipment considerations (e.g. rigging, cameras, lights, microphones, airbags)
  • Communication systems (e.g. intercom and designated channel)
  • Signaling system to alert personnel to the vehicle’s impending movement
  • Visibility
  • Special effects
  • Personal protective equipment (e.g. harnesses, seat belts, helmets, eye protection)
  • Traffic and pedestrian control (e.g. street closures, ITC)
  • Emergency plan (e.g. escape routes and contingency plan)

If there is a substantive change in the choreography, equipment, or personnel involved in the shot, the individuals involved should discuss and decide if a subsequent safety meeting and rehearsal should be held.

Operation

Depending on the road conditions, speed, weather, controlled/uncontrolled environments, etc., the following should be considered during rehearsals and filming:

  • Only essential personnel required for the shot should be allowed on or in the vehicle.
  • Equipment and personnel should not disrupt, distract the driver, or compromise the safety of the vehicle operation.
  • Cast and crew riding in the vehicle must be provided a safe and secure place to ride.
  • While filming from inside the vehicle, personnel should be restrained with suitable straps/harnesses. The camera and gear should be properly secured.
  • A generator, when needed, should not be positioned where the cast and crew may be exposed to the exhaust.
  • If using batteries with or without an inverter, the batteries must sit flat and be secured in an upright position. Batteries can get hot and should not be placed against anything combustible.
  • When possible, a remote ON/OFF control switch should be used to run and stop the camera when it is door or hood mounted; a camera assistant rushing to the car to turn off the camera can create a hazard.
  • The performer should not be tasked with “slating” if the vehicle is already in motion.
  • Use comms/walkies to communicate between all parties.
  • Driver should keep within legal speed limits and drive within the law, safely and responsibly to ensure that driving actions do not cause any hazards to oncoming traffic/drivers (if applicable).
  • After each run, a general inspection should be conducted to ensure all equipment is secure. If at any time a camera or other equipment is deemed to be “unsteady,” filming should cease and adjustments made accordingly.

Related Bulletins

Alternative Driving Systems

Safety Bulletin

Guidelines

These guidelines are intended to give recommendations for safely working on and around Alternative Driving Systems (ADS) e.g., Pods. An ADS is typically a custom‐built device that is connected to the vehicle so that the vehicle can be driven safely without the person sitting in the normal driving position controlling the steering, accelerator, brakes, or other components. This Safety Bulletin does not address the use of wireless‐controlled vehicle systems.

ADS should only be operated to the levels for which they are designed based upon the requirements and conditions discussed between the Production and the ADS manufacturer or fabricator. The design, fabrication, and assembly of ADS are not covered in this Safety Bulletin.

Responsible Person

Production shall assign a Responsible Person or Persons. A Responsible Person is someone with both the experience and training to recognize and resolve problems relating to the configuration and operation of the ADS. The Responsible Person will have authority over all ADS operations.

Considerations for Using an ADS

  • Type of vehicle to which the ADS will be installed
  • Intended speed and maneuvers
  • ADS rigged vehicle operating in close proximity to other vehicles
  • Aircraft flown in close proximity
  • Scene action (e.g., stunts, performance, and special effects)
  • Route conditions (e.g., curved, incline, crown, obstacles, clearances, length, width, paved, gravel, dirt, flat, hilly, wet, or slippery)
  • Anticipated weather
  • Evaluation of the vehicle’s original systems and whether they should be disengaged (e.g., brakes, ignition, airbags, steering, and accelerator)
  • A secure area for cast and crew riding in or on the ADS vehicle
  • Load capacity, center of gravity, and counter‐balance
  • Equipment weight, placement and use (e.g., camera, lighting, and props)
  • Visibility conditions of ADS operator such as dust, spray, blinding lights, restrictive covering over the windshield, smoke
  • Emergency stop system
  • Communication system
  • Allowing time for proving/testing the system

Pre‐Rig

The capabilities and limitations of the ADS should be communicated to all applicable departments. All rigging of the ADS and equipment, including cameras and lights, is to be performed by qualified personnel in an area secured for the purpose of rigging, which is free of known hazards, including other vehicular traffic. The rigging must be discussed with the Responsible Person and the ADS operator prior to the use of the vehicle. The Responsible Person and ADS operator must inspect the vehicle after any rigging change is made to ensure that the change will not adversely affect the safe operation of the vehicle. Only authorized persons should be in the secured area. When the ADS vehicle is not in operation, steps should be taken to ensure the vehicle cannot inadvertently move.

Inspection

The connected vehicle must be inspected before and after each run. Inspection items include, but are not limited to, the ADS, brakes, steering, tires, engine, drive train, vehicle’s electrical system, connection points, towing equipment, and all safety equipment. Any items not fully functioning must be repaired by a qualified person before use.

Prior to Operation

A walk through with the performer(s) should be conducted regarding which of the vehicle’s original systems are operational and which have been disengaged.

A rehearsal should be considered to familiarize the performer with the operational characteristics of the vehicle and controls.

Safety Meetings

A shot‐specific safety meeting should be held by the First Assistant Director, Responsible Person, and Stunt Coordinator, as needed, involving all personnel riding in, on, or in close proximity (e.g., stunt personnel or background performers) to the ADS vehicle. This meeting should discuss the following topics below:

  • Shot sequence and route (e.g., stunt action including crossovers/head‐on or near misses, vehicle speed, number and proximity of other vehicles, crew and camera placement, background performers, and property)
  • Walk‐through or dry‐run
  • Environmental conditions (e.g., weather, surface conditions, such as cement, gravel or dirt, topography, such as flat or hilly)
  • Possible changes due to hazards
  • Authority to abort including signals to be used
  • Route conditions (e.g., slope, curved, incline, crown, obstacles, clearances, length and width)
  • Equipment considerations (e.g., rigging, exposed controls, drive systems, air bags, automatic roll bar, and fuel‐cell position)
  • Communication systems (e.g., intercom and designated channel)
  • Signaling system to alert personnel to the ADS impending movement
  • Visibility
  • Special effects
  • Personal protective equipment (e.g., harnesses, seat belts, helmets, and eye protection)
  • Traffic and pedestrian control (e.g., street closures and Intermittent Traffic Control (ITC))
  • Emergency plan (e.g., escape routes and contingency plan)

If for any reason there is a change in the choreography or personnel involved in the shot, a safety meeting must be held with all personnel involved to ensure everyone understands the changes.

Operation

During rehearsals and takes:

  • The Responsible Person and/or the ADS Operator has the authority to suspend operation of the ADS vehicle, including the ability to abort
  • Changes should be approved by the Responsible Person and/or ADS Operator
  • The ADS vehicle and equipment should be inspected after each run
  • Do not approach, enter, or exit the ADS without permission from the Responsible Person, First Assistant Director, or ADS Operator
  • Only essential personnel required for the shot should be allowed on or in the ADS vehicle
  • Cast and crew riding on or in the ADS vehicle must be provided a safe and secure place to ride

Related Bulletins

Gimbals

Safety Bulletin

Guidelines

These guidelines are intended to give recommendations for safely working on and around gimbals. Gimbals are generally one-of-a-kind, purpose-built devices designed to simulate real-world movement. Challenging environments, such as an airplane in flight, a ship in a storm, and many others may be simulated through the use of a gimbal. Gimbals are typically used to move cast, crew, and sets through a number of programmed or choreographed motions. Gimbals can range in complexity from small-scale, seesaw-type devices moved by simple leverage to complex, multi-axis powered motion bases controlled by computer.

Gimbals are typically designed for specific applications and short duration operation. Gimbals should only operate to the level for which they are designed. Design and assembly of the gimbal is not covered in this Safety Bulletin. This Bulletin assumes that the gimbal has been properly assembled and is fully operational with a clearly defined Exclusion Zone (e.g., marked with tape, barricades, etc.). The Exclusion Zone is the immediate area surrounding a gimbal where only authorized cast and crew are allowed.

Responsible Person

Production shall assign a Responsible Person for the safe configuration and operation of the gimbal. A Responsible Person is defined as someone with both the experience and training to recognize and resolve problems relating to the safe operation of the gimbal.

The Responsible Person will have the ultimate authority over all gimbal operations, including, but not limited to:

  • Determining the maximum weight capacity on the gimbal
  • Marking the Exclusion Zone around the gimbal and control areas
  • When Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) or Residual Current Devices (RCD) should be used for the gimbal or its controls
  • The authority to abort operations. They may designate an operator(s) as needed.

Set Construction and Pre-Rig

  1. Limitations of the gimbal should be communicated to all applicable departments by the Responsible Person.
  2. Reevaluate Exclusion Zone. The Exclusion Zone may change as construction and pre-rigging occurs.
  3. Establish work procedures (e.g., lockout/tagout/blockout, fall protection, guardrails, etc.) and other special procedures for working on or around the gimbal.
  4. Establish emergency shutdown procedures. The dynamic action of the gimbal may create an additional hazard to personnel working on or around the gimbal if it is suddenly shutdown. Personnel on or around the gimbal may have to take specific action to protect themselves in the case of an emergency shutdown.
  5. The Responsible Person should be consulted before operating heavy equipment (e.g., aerial lifts, camera cranes, forklifts, etc.) around the gimbal, hydraulic lines, and/or control lines.
  6. When necessary, crib or block to prevent parts from moving inadvertently when the gimbal is not in operation.
  7. Ensure crossovers and/or protective covers are used to protect hoses, electrical cables, and control lines and to prevent possible tripping hazards.

Safety Meetings During Construction and Pre-Rig

Make crew and applicable department heads aware of the designated Responsible Person, Exclusion Zone parameters, gimbal limitations, work procedures, emergency procedures, and individuals authorized to be inside the Exclusion Zone.

All items included in Set Construction and Pre-Rig should be reevaluated throughout the production as conditions change.

Inspection and Testing

Representatives from all applicable departments shall be included in conducting inspections of their equipment on or around the gimbal, prior to operation.

The Responsible Person should:

  1. Reevaluate the limitations of the gimbal such as, but not limited to, load capacity, how it may be affected by water, weather, additional equipment, structures, dust effects, etc.
  2. Inspect gimbal, base, hoses, structure, service connections to equipment on the gimbal (e.g., electrical special effects), etc.
  3. Test controls.
  4. Evaluate potential impact on cast and crew within the intended load and range of movement.
  5. Prior to operation, verify the Exclusion Zone is free of any unauthorized persons or items.
  6. Check for electrical and/or radio and wireless interference, and maintain the proper perimeter around the gimbal and computer controls.

Prior to Rehearsal and Filming

Reevaluate the Exclusion Zone and communicate to all cast and crew (size and operation of the gimbal will dictate).

Please follow Inspection and Testing items 1–6 above.

Inspect and test other production-related equipment on or around the gimbal.

Safety Meeting

The First Assistant Director shall, along with the Responsible Person, conduct a safety meeting with all cast and crew, including, when necessary, a stunt coordinator, prior to working on or around the gimbal.

Safety meeting topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Communicating to all involved personnel, including performers, the intended action, full range of movement, need for increased awareness, possible changes, and authority to abort, including any visual or audio signals to be used.
  • Authorized personnel riding the gimbal should consider their health status and report any concerns to the appropriate person.
  • The possible effects of electrical or radio and wireless devices on radio-sensitive equipment.
  • Awaiting Responsible Person to give permission before approaching the gimbal.
  • The perimeter of the Exclusion Zone.
  • Emergency Shutdown Procedures.

The Responsible Person should be notified of any changes or concerns in the use of the gimbal, action of the cast or crew, or placement of equipment in order to determine whether an additional safety meeting is necessary.

Ongoing Testing

The Responsible Person or his/her designee shall conduct a test of all controls at least prior to the gimbal being used during each work shift and upon returning to the gimbal from breaks.

During Operation

  1. Follow established procedures when entering the Exclusion Zone.
  2. Gimbal Operator needs a clear line of sight or, if needed, a spotter to assist.
  3. Gimbal Operator should be at the controls at all times when the gimbal is operational.
  4. Gimbal should be stopped if unauthorized personnel enter the Exclusion Zone.
  5. Watch for loose materials, sharp edges, pinch points, etc.
  6. Authorized cast and crew should be made aware of the capabilities and anticipated movement of the gimbal.
  7. Ensure clear, safe access and egress.
  8. Maintain reliable communications during operation.
  9. Always wait for the Responsible Person to give permission before approaching the gimbal.
  10. Secure set pieces, production equipment, and props on the gimbal.
  11. On computer controlled gimbals, ensure the computer has an uninterrupted power supply to allow reliable operation and shutdown in the event of a power interruption.

Additional Considerations

Production Management and the Responsible Person shall take the following into consideration and address with the appropriate personnel:

  • Fall protection for cast and crew; for example, barriers, guard rails, pads, or fall restraint equipment including appropriate anchor points
  • All electrical distribution system components exposed to water should be designed to work in water
  • Galvanic action, which is corrosion from contact between dissimilar metals
  • Inspection of underwater equipment
  • Windy conditions
  • Environmental and human factors
  • Hydraulic leaks
  • Inclement weather
  • Access to the gimbal by cast and crew
  • Placement of electrical equipment and power supply system
  • Lockout/Tagout/Blockout

Related Bulletins

Non-Camera Utility Vehicles

Safety Bulletin

Guidelines

These guidelines address non-camera utility vehicles used for production support, such as ATVs, golf carts, snowmobiles and utility vehicles with small engines and/or electric powered. Vehicle operators must observe all applicable rules and regulations. In order to provide a safe workplace, the following vehicle guidelines have been established regardless of the type of vehicle used:

  1. Horseplay or careless operation is not allowed and will not be tolerated.
  2. Inspect the vehicle before use.
  3. Understand the vehicle controls. If you do not know how to operate the vehicle, ask for instruction. Employers/production have the obligation to ensure that employees are instructed in the safe use and operation of the vehicle.
  4. Operators have the responsibility for the safe transportation of passengers and equipment.
  5. Operators should hold a valid driver’s license and if not held, notify production.
  6. Each passenger must have a seat. No sitting on laps, standing on bumpers or riding on tailgates. Multiple people sitting in a seat designated for one and riding on parts of the vehicle that are not designed for that purpose are strictly prohibited.
  7. Wear a seat belt, if provided.
  8. Keep arms and legs in the vehicle at all times.
  9. If the vehicle is not equipped with a windshield, eye protection is recommended.
  10. A helmet may be necessary in certain situations.
  11. If the vehicle is equipped to carry loads, secure or place them in a manner that will not allow them to shift or fall from the vehicle.
  12. Do not exceed the manufacturers’ load recommendations as overloading can affect braking and control of the vehicle. Loads should be appropriately balanced.
  13. Do not operate the vehicle in a manner that is dangerous to you or to others.
  14. Always use caution around people and animals. Pedestrians always have the right of way.
  15. Exercise caution going around corners. Look for hazards, such as other vehicles and people.
  16. Be familiar with the terrain.
  17. To reduce the risk of rollovers, avoid driving off curbs, from one level to another, and/or turning on inclines.
  18. Drive at speeds appropriate to the surface, road and weather conditions (e.g., driving in dirt or gravel, on a steep incline, on ice, in rain, etc.).
  19. In poor visibility, vehicles should not be operated unless equipped with headlights or sufficient lighting is provided.
  20. Towing should only be performed in a manner specified by the manufacturer.

Using and working safely around non-camera utility vehicles requires the full attention and care of the entire crew. Horseplay and excessive speed are the primary causes of accidents and injuries. Extreme caution should be used when operating these vehicles.

Operators are responsible to follow these safety guidelines, employer guidelines and manufacturer operating manuals for the safe operation of these types of vehicles.

Related Bulletins