#daily-production

D1 Handoff Chart

Below is a chart showing the handoff of the following items from one show to the next during the D1 cycle.

  • Critchfield Keys
  • Production iPads
  • Media Cards
  • Walkies
  • Craft Service Bins
  • Director’s Viewfinders
  • Script Supervisor Laptops
  • Camera Batteries

RED Camera Settings (D1)

Format

  • Resolution: 7K
    • This refers to the amount of the sensor that will be used, not necessarily the resolution of the file being recorded. The 7K resolution ensures that our lenses will project properly onto the sensor.
  • Aspect Ratio: FF
    • The aspect ratio needs to be set to FF (Full Frame). This refers to the aspect ratio of the above resolution, and FF ensures that the recorded file will be 2K (2048×1080).

Codec

  • Record File Format: Avid DNxHD/HR
    • This file format is optimized for the post-production workflows using AVID Media Composer that we us for the D1 projects.
  • Resolution: 2K
    • This refers to the resolution of the recorded file. When you select 2K, confirm that the dimensions are listed as 2048×1080. If the dimensions are listed as something different, check to make sure that the aspect ratio (see above) is set to FF.
  • Video Codec: Avid DNxHD/HR SQ
    • This provides s a good balance of quality and size. Pay particular attention to this setting, as your footage make be unusable if you do not set this correctly.
  • Baked-In Settings: Rec. 709/SDR
    • This ensures that the video file will be recorded with a 709 gamma curve that will yield a pleasing picture on everyone’s monitoring environment without much trouble.

Image Pipeline

  • Mode: IPP2
    • This is RED’s latest, recommended color pipeline.
  • Output Color Space: Rec. 709
    Output Tone Map: Medium Contrast
    Highlight Roll-Off: Medium
    • These Output Transforms convert the RED WideGamutRGB/Log3G10 image into a Rec .709 image that will be easier to work with and will appear correct to your eyes.
  • Output Summary
    • The output summary should appear as above. This is to confirm that the camera will not be recording a R3D file, but an Avid DNxHD/HR SQ file in Rec. 709.

Frame Guide

  • Mode: 1.85:1
    • The frame guide mode should be set to 1.85:1 unless you are framing for one of the other approved aspect ratios (2.39:1 Scope or 1.375:1 Academy). The frame guides ensure that — while you are recording into a 2K 2048×1080 container, which has an aspect ratio of 1.90:1 — you are actually framing for one of the approved aspect ratios.

Media Card Format

  • File System: UDF
    • The Camera Assistant should check that the RED MAG media card is set to UDF before formatting the card.
  • Reel Number
    • The Reel Number should be reset to “1” at the beginning of each show and then versioned up with every RED MAG change.

Producer Responsibilities (D1)

Pre-Production

  • Meet with the Head of Production to discuss the project you are producing.
  • Complete a Location Agreement and Shooting Plan with the Head of Production for the space(s) at Critchfield you intend to use.
  • Organize the Tech Scout of the location with the ATL. Establish where the restrooms, parking, staging, base camp and set will be. Complete a Location Hazard Assessment Checklist. If any location hazards, then also complete a Hazard Notification Report.
  • Have each actor sign a Performance Agreement.
  • Break down the script and create the Production Schedule in Scenechronize.
  • Create a Setup Schedule with the DP.
  • Prepare all scheduling information and other materials required for Directors Prep.
  • Attend Directors Prep and takes notes for the Director.
  • Assist the Director with any and all logistical needs to prepare for principal photography.
  • Run the Production Meeting by reading the action of the script. Answer crew members’ questions. Have each crew member sign a Crew Deal Memo.
  • Prepare all the paperwork needed on set.
  • Check the weather periodically to monitor adverse conditions. Have a back-up plan.
  • Pick up Craft Services by the night before production.
  • Pre-order lunch and arrange for it to be picked up by a volunteer or delivered on the day of production.
  • Have a Greenlight Meeting with the Head of Production, during which you will:
    • Show all completed Location Documents.
    • Follow through on any questions that were brought up in the previous Producer Meeting.
    • Pick up camera & sound cards.
    • If producing a Friday show, also pick up a key to Critchfield.
  • Script Supe laptop and walkies
    • If producing a Friday show, check out a Script Supe laptop and walkies from the ER.
    • If producing a Saturday show, check out a Script Supe laptop from the ER.
  • Properly format Final Draft script and upload into ScriptE on the Script Supe laptop.
  • Double check every logistical piece of information and make sure nothing has been forgotten.
  • Create the Call Sheet, including a map, and email it no later than 12hrs before call time.

On Set

START OF DAY

  • Arrive at set FIRST, 30 minutes to an hour early.
  • Establish Base Camp.
    • Set up Zone B Checkpoint with Walkies, Production iPad, and forehead thermometer where crew will check in when they arrive.
    • Set up Craft Service table where crew will collect their snacks during check in.
  • When trucks arrive, verify they are parking in the correct place.
  • As crew members arrive, take their forehead temperature, check them in using the Production iPad, and hand them a walkie.
  • Give the Script Supe laptop to the Script Supe.
  • At call time, have a Safety Meeting with the entire crew. Complete the Safety Meeting Report.

THROUGHOUT THE DAY

  • Run through the 1st AD Set Procedure: Block, New Deal, Build, Rehearse, Shoot…
  • Manage the time on the set by keeping up with the Setup Schedule. Adjust schedule as needed.
  • Look ahead to next setups and make sure departments are prepared and working ahead.
  • Verify with volunteer or caterer that lunch will be brought to set in time to set it up prior to releasing for lunch.

MEALS

  • Six hours after Call Time, release the cast & crew for lunch.
  • Make periodic announcements on time remaining on lunch.
  • Make sure lunch does not exceed one hour.

END OF DAY

  • At Camera Wrap, make sure crew sanitizes equipment while wrapping safely and efficiently. Make sure to have Company Wrap on time.
  • Complete the Performers Time Report, and have the actors sign it before they are dismissed for the day.
  • Make sure 2nd AC, Script Supe, and Sound Mixer meet at end of day to verify their reports. Have them give you all reports.
  • Collect the camera card from the 2nd AC, and the sound card from the Sound Mixer.
  • Have crew members sign out using the iPad. Once all crew has clocked out and returned their walkies, plug in the iPad and walkies for the next day’s production. Monday Producers can hold on to the walkies and return them to the ER by 10am on Tuesday; and hold on to the iPad to return to the Head of Production by 10am Tuesday.
  • Once the Script Supe is finished with the SS laptop, then pass that laptop to the crew member who is the Producer in pre-pro the following day (i.e. the Friday Producer passes it to the Sunday Producer; the Saturday Producer passes it to the Monday Producer). Sunday and Monday Producers can hold on to the SS laptop to return to the ER by 10am Tuesday.
  • Clean and secure location. Be the LAST TO LEAVE (except perhaps Art Dept). Leave the location better than when you arrived.
  • Pass the key to Critchfield to the Producer for the next day’s production. Monday Producers can hold on to the key and return it to the Head of Production by 10am Tuesday.
  • Complete the Daily Production Report and distribute within 2 hours after Company Wrap.

Post-Production

  • Turn in Camera Reports, Camera Cards & Sound Cards to the cubbie in the ingest room in the Post Hall as soon as possible after wrap.
  • Sunday Producers turn in SS laptop, and Monday Producers turn in iPad and SS laptop to the Head of Production by 10am on Tuesday after production.
  • Turn in Production Delivery Paperwork via OneDrive to the Head of Production by 9am Thursday after production.

Daily Production Report

Production Paperwork

INSTRUCTIONS

The Second Assistant Director is responsible for sending out a PDF of the Daily Production Report (DPR) at the end of every shooting day, no later than two hours after wrap. If the production does not have a dedicated Second Assistant Director, the First Assistant Director or Producer shall assume the responsibility.

The purpose of the DPR is to communicate important information from the day’s production, such as number of setups, start and end times, in and out times, reports on delays, and reports on equipment problems. If an urgent problem or situation arises on set, however, do not wait until the end of day to report it; contact the appropriate individuals immediately. (Make sure it is documented on the DPR at the end of the day as well, though.)

Post the completed DPR the #dpr channel on Slack. The PDF file should be formatted with production number and show title as follows: 

01f3-Film Title - DPR - Day 1

SAMPLE

Call Sheet

Production Paperwork

INSTRUCTIONS

The purpose of the call sheet is to provide all the pertinent information about the next day’s production. The Second Assistant Director is responsible for distributing a PDF of each day’s call sheet to the cast, crew, faculty, and FSU police. If the production does not have a dedicated Second Assistant Director, the First Assistant Director or Producer shall assume the responsibility.

Call sheets, along with any relevant additional information such as maps or safety bulletins, must be emailed out no later than 12 hours before call time on the first day of production and no later than the previous day’s company wrap for all subsequent days. It is important to thoroughly check — and double-check — and triple-check — that all the information in the call sheet is correct before it is sent out, because the distribution of revisions can create confusion.

EMAIL INSTRUCTIONS

The email subject must be formatted with production number and show title included, as follows: 01f3-Film Title - Call Sheet - Day 1

You may include a brief, executive summary of important information in the body of the email, but this should not be a substitute for providing all relevant information in the call sheet itself.

Required recipients are:

SAMPLE CALL SHEET

1st AD Protocol (Cheat Sheet)

This is a streamlined “cheat sheet” for seasoned 1st ADs. Twirl open any callout and the complete description of that step will be displayed. Please remember that all GREEN CALLS are made over the radio and are repeated by the 2nd AD, while all BLUE CALLS are made to on-set crew only and are not repeated by the 2nd AD.

Daily Protocol

Morning Meeting

We are having the morning meeting
  • Precisely at call time, the 1D gathers the crew by the trucks for the morning meeting. The 1D goes over the logistics of the day and addresses safety concerns.
  • COVID: Due to the congregation of all crew members, the morning meeting should ideally be performed outside. If the space does not permit all crew to congregate with physical distancing, the crew should be divided into smaller groups and the meeting should be repeated for each group.
Work safely, everyone
  • This concludes the morning meeting. 1D then gathers DR, DP, SS, 2C, and goes to set.

WORKING OUT THE BLOCKING

Clear the set for blocking
  • If DR is ready, the 1D asks 2D to escort the actors to set, so that DR and actors can work out the blocking. During this time, 1D manages crew staging, while periodically monitoring DR.
Are we ready to mark the blocking?
  • If DR is ready, 1D invites DP, SS, and 2C to set and oversees the determination of coverage.

WORKING OUT THE COVERAGE

Observe the crew working out the coverage
  • DR and DP watch the action that’s been worked out with the actors. Together they discuss any changes. 1D watches and checks that: DP watches the coverage through a viewfinder or lens; SS watches eyelines and notes coverage plan; 2C marks the actors’ stopped positions with colored tape.
  • COVID: Physical distancing must be maintained during the laying down of marks. Either the actors should step back while the 2C lays down the mark, or the actor should be provided tape to lay down their own mark.
Are we ready for the New Deal?
  • Only when the plan is agreed upon, 1D calls:

NEW DEAL

We have a New Deal
  • 1D confirms all department heads are present. DR shows the action.
  • COVID: If physical distancing is not possible due to space limitations, the New Deal should be repeated for smaller clusters of department heads.
Questions on the blocking?
  • DR fields queries, then shows/explains coverage.
Questions on the coverage?
  • DR fields questions on the plan. 1D facilitates, making sure every department is anticipating issues.
Is the plan good?

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

BUILDING IT

OK, let's build it. Thank you, First Team.
  • 2D escorts First Team (DR and actors) to base camp. 1D quietly gets a setup time estimate from the DP. (Note: No one else but 1D and DR need ask about time or guess how long things will take.) From this point on, 1D is quietly monitoring progress and updating department time estimates.
  • Ways of being helpful throughout this process include: “Let’s get the frame” … “Let’s get focus” … “Let’s get a boom line” … “Work quietly”
  • COVID: Crew must maintain physical distancing at all times, except for where a technical operation makes it impossible. Such moments should be kept to a bare minimum and undertaken with extreme caution. If the space does not permit crew members to maintain physical distancing, 1D must organize the staggering and rotation of different departments’ work. This is something that should have been identified during the tech scout, so a plan should already have been discussed for this in advance of the production day.
  • COVID: Camera placement should be more than six feet away from any actor. Any exceptions to this need to have been approved during Director’s Prep.
  • COVID: Set up video village in a location to minimize crowding around the monitor. Only two, physically distancing crew members may be at video village at one time, with priority given to DR and SS.
  • COVID: SM gives a sanitized wireless lav to each actor and instructs them how to secure the mic. If necessary, SM may secure the mic themselves, but the physical proximity should be kept to a minimum duration and an extra level of protection should be considered, such as a face-shield or a plexiglass divider.
Are we ready for camera rehearsal?

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Camera Rehearsal

Camera rehearsal is up. Stand by.
  • 2D asks DR if they wish to be present. DR either comes to set or 2D informs 1D to proceed without DR. (If DR does not come to set, 1D calls “action” and “cut” instead.)
  • COVID: Do not use actors for the camera rehearsal, and keep minimal crew on set.
Camera ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
We are going for camera rehearsal...
  • Action is called. Technical team runs shot.
...That's a cut on camera rehearsal
How was that for camera?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
How was that for sound?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

BAD FOR EITHER
Troubleshoot

GOOD FOR BOTH
Proceed

Camera ready for rehearsal?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready for rehearsal?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Rehearsal

Essential personnel only, please.
  • COVID: The set is about to become a Zone A space, so 1D clears the set of all non-essential personnel.
First Team in, please
  • 2D brings DR and actors to set. Everything must be ready!
Everyone work quietly. First team is on set.
  • DR works with actors. (Note: Rehearsal moves directly into shooting. If any technical issue arise that cannot be solved immediately, 1D releases First Team until it is solved.)
  • COVID: Actors should ideally remain in masks during rehearsals. If masks need to be removed for any reason, consider deploying other protections, such as plexiglass barriers.
Rehearsal is up. Stand by.
  • 1D waits and confirms visually when DR is ready.
Quiet, please. We are going for rehearsal...
  • DR calls “action” and “cut.” This should be treated like it is a take by all set personnel. Make sure the set is locked up.
...That's a cut on rehearsal. Stand by.
  • While DR checks in with the actors, 1D checks in with camera and sound for feedback. 1D relays this information to DR, who chooses to rehearse again or proceed. Are we ready to shoot?
Are we ready to shoot?

NO
Call: “We are going again. Stand by.”

YES
Proceed

Last Looks

Picture is up. Last looks.
Camera ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Director ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Going for picture

We are going for picture. Lock it up.
  • It’s GO time. Listen to ensure set is locked up. Be very sure EVERYONE is actually ready, especially DR and actors, before calling:
  • COVID: Slating should be at least six feet from any actors. If the lens or space does not allow for that, a pan over to the slate should be used instead.
  • COVID: Actors should remove their own masks. If the shot doesn’t permit them to keep the mask on their person, PD should provide a Ziploc bag with the actor’s name on it and PD should manage the Ziploc bags during takes.
  • COVID: If hair and makeup needs to make an adjustment due to the masks, this should occur swiftly.
  • COVID: If DR wants to go again quickly, and actors consent, masks can stay off between takes.
Roll sound...
  • If sound is being recorded on a dedicated field recorder, use Cadence for Dual-System Sound.
  • If sound is being recorded by the camera, use Cadence for Single-System Sound.
Cadence for dual-system sound

  • SM calls SPEED
  • 2C VOICE SLATES
  • 1C rolls camera and Camera Operator calls SPEED
  • 2C calls MARKER and clacks the sticks
  • Camera Operator calls FRAME
  • 1D calls MASKS OFF (actors remove masks)
  • DR calls ACTION, watches take, and calls CUT
  • 1D calls MASKS ON (actors replace masks)

Cadence for single-system sound

  • 1C rolls camera and Camera Operator calls SPEED
  • 2C VOICE SLATES
  • 2C calls MARKER and clacks the sticks
  • Camera Operator calls FRAME
  • 1D calls MASKS OFF (actors remove masks)
  • DR calls ACTION, watches take, and calls CUT
  • 1D calls MASKS ON (actors replace masks)

That's a cut on picture. Stand by.
  • 1D checks in with camera and sound to see if the take was good or if a technical issue may require another take.
  • 1D relays this information to DR, and checks to see if the DR would like to go again or move on to the next set-up.
Ready to move on?

NO
Repeat

YES
Proceed

Moving on

Thank you, First Team
  • 2D escorts the actors (and DR if desired) off set and the crew comes in to execute the next set-up.
  • COVID: After the First Team has left the set, 1D allows crew to re-enter the space.
We are moving on to... (describe next set-up)
  • Move on to the next planned set-up as indicated previously during the New Deal. 1D restates shot as previously described.
  • Return to BUILDING IT and proceed until all scene coverage is complete.
  • When the scene is complete, return to WORKING OUT THE BLOCKING for next scene.
  • Continue this process for the rest of the day.
  • During the day, if the production falls behind schedule or if any problems arise, 1D should be proactive in conferring privately with DR and/or DP on how to solve the problems. This can be done quietly and discreetly on set or during breaks, such as lunch.
  • COVID: Departments should sanitize equipment throughout the day during free moments, especially anything to be handled by others in the department.

Important Time-Based Items

Start of Day

First shot is off at (state time)
  • Recording the time of the first shot of the day (and the first shot after lunch) is an important item that is reported to the studio on the DPR.

Midday

That's lunch
  • At exactly the 6-hour mark after first call time Lunch must be called. If the team has already rolled on a set-up you can go into “Grace,” which means work must then be completed within 12 minutes. You cannot shoot past this or you are in meal penalty.
  • During lunch, 1D talks to DR and the DP about the rest of the day’s work and participates in making any adjustments to the plan and/or schedule to help make the day.
  • COVID: Boxed lunches should be delivered to the team spaces for each department, so as to avoid having people congregating around a single lunch table.
  • COVID: Since masks need to be off for eating, extra precaution must be taken. Eating outside with maximum distance between people is recommended.
  • COVID: Staggering the start time for lunch for different departments is recommended, if the schedule permits. Staggering the start time for lunch is required if physical distancing is not possible at the location.
Ten Minutes
  • Ten minutes before the end of lunch the 1st AD announces this to everyone.
We're back
  • This call marks the official end of lunch. All crew is required to return to work. 1D should remind everyone what set-up is first up after lunch.
  • COVID: After lunch, PR makes sure that high-touch surfaces get a sanitizing wipe down and each department sanitizes heavily used items of equipment.

End of Day

This is the Abby Singer
  • 1D alerts the crew that this is the second-to-last set up. (Be sure it actually is before announcing.) This is a morale boost as the day nears its end.
This is the martini
  • 1D alerts the crew that this is the last set up of the day. (BE SURE it actually is before announcing.) This is a bigger morale boost as the day nears its end.
That's a day (and/or picture) wrap for
(actor's name)
  • Crew applauds to thank the talent for the day’s work or for their work over multiple days on the whole picture.
That's a day (and/or picture) wrap for
(production name)
  • Crew celebrates a hard day’s work. “Picture Wrap” can be an emotional call after weeks of work on a feature.
Company Wrap
  • 1D talks to the DR and the DP about the next day’s work and any adjustments to the plan and/or schedule.
  • 1D signs off on the Daily Production Report (DPR), which is sent back to production by the 2D.
  • COVID: 1D makes sure that camera wrap happens no less than 60 minutes before company wrap, to allow sufficient time for loading out and cleaning the location.
  • COVID: Actors change out of wardrobe, preferably in a single-person occupancy changing room. PD places any wardrobe supplied by the production in a secure bag to be laundered if used again. If actors need to remove their masks, the changing room becomes a Zone A space.
  • COVID: Equipment should be reloaded back into the truck in a prescribed sequence. Only one crew member is permitted in the back of the truck at a time. Physical distancing must be observed at all times. Each department should clean equipment during wrap.
  • COVID: Doors Down Meeting should ideally be performed outside. If the space does not permit all crew to congregate with adequate physical distancing, the crew may divide up into departmental groups for separate, smaller doors down meetings.
  • COVID: 2D keeps access to location restricted until last crew member has left. The plan for sanitizing the location at company wrap must be completed before the 2D leaves the location.

1st AD Protocol

Overview

This document is intended to serve as a guide to help 1st Assistant Directors understand the role, as well as to supply set-specific jargon and the proper sequence of “callouts,” which are only a small part of the 1st AD’s job.

The role of the 1st AD is an important and multi-faceted one, involving organization, anticipation, communication, problem-solving, leadership, support, morale-building, time-budgeting, and resource allocation. It is a role that is critical in planning and scheduling a film during prep, and one that is vital for smooth set operation during production. The 1st AD runs the set and works just as hard as either the DP or the Director.

It is the responsibility of the 1st AD to know where everyone is, so crew must inform the AD department if they briefly leave set (e.g., “I’m 10-1”). The 1st AD always remains by camera; if the show has a base camp away from set, the 1st AD should communicate with the 2nd AD by radio. The 1st AD tracks the time but does not harass people about it. Good ADs need never raise their voice because they have not allowed things to reach that point. Above all else, it is the 1st AD’s job to watch, facilitate, and anticipate problems for the betterment of the film, not simply to “make the day.”

GREEN CALLS
ARE MADE OVER THE RADIO AND REPEATED BY 2ND AD

BLUE CALLS
ARE MADE ONLY TO ON-SET CREW AND NOT REPEATED BY 2ND AD

Daily Protocol

Having already been instrumental in helping to schedule the order of shots and estimating the time for each, a typical day for the 1st AD on set goes as follows. Note: On shows with smaller crews – such as F1s and F2s – some of the crew positions listed in this protocol may not have a dedicated crew member performing the role. If there is not a dedicated 2nd AD, the 1st AD should either assume those responsibilities or delegate them to another person. If there is not a dedicated Script Supervisor or 2nd AC, the Producer is responsible for making sure that other crew members cover the relevant tasks described in this protocol.

Morning Meeting

We are having the morning meeting
  • Precisely at call time, the 1D gathers the crew by the trucks for the morning meeting. The 1D goes over the logistics of the day and addresses safety concerns.
  • COVID: Due to the congregation of all crew members, the morning meeting should ideally be performed outside. If the space does not permit all crew to congregate with physical distancing, the crew should be divided into smaller groups and the meeting should be repeated for each group.
Work safely, everyone
  • This concludes the morning meeting. 1D then gathers DR, DP, SS, 2C, and goes to set.

WORKING OUT THE BLOCKING

Clear the set for blocking
  • If DR is ready, the 1D asks 2D to escort the actors to set, so that DR and actors can work out the blocking. During this time, 1D manages crew staging, while periodically monitoring DR.
Are we ready to mark the blocking?
  • If DR is ready, 1D invites DP, SS, and 2C to set and oversees the determination of coverage.

WORKING OUT THE COVERAGE

Observe the crew working out the coverage
  • DR and DP watch the action that’s been worked out with the actors. Together they discuss any changes. 1D watches and checks that: DP watches the coverage through a viewfinder or lens; SS watches eyelines and notes coverage plan; 2C marks the actors’ stopped positions with colored tape.
  • COVID: Physical distancing must be maintained during the laying down of marks. Either the actors should step back while the 2C lays down the mark, or the actor should be provided tape to lay down their own mark.
Are we ready for the New Deal?
  • Only when the plan is agreed upon, 1D calls:

NEW DEAL

We have a New Deal
  • 1D confirms all department heads are present. DR shows the action.
  • COVID: If physical distancing is not possible due to space limitations, the New Deal should be repeated for smaller clusters of department heads.
Questions on the blocking?
  • DR fields queries, then shows/explains coverage.
Questions on the coverage?
  • DR fields questions on the plan. 1D facilitates, making sure every department is anticipating issues.
Is the plan good?

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

BUILDING IT

OK, let's build it. Thank you, First Team.
  • 2D escorts First Team (DR and actors) to base camp. 1D quietly gets a setup time estimate from the DP. (Note: No one else but 1D and DR need ask about time or guess how long things will take.) From this point on, 1D is quietly monitoring progress and updating department time estimates.
  • Ways of being helpful throughout this process include: “Let’s get the frame” … “Let’s get focus” … “Let’s get a boom line” … “Work quietly”
  • COVID: Crew must maintain physical distancing at all times, except for where a technical operation makes it impossible. Such moments should be kept to a bare minimum and undertaken with extreme caution. If the space does not permit crew members to maintain physical distancing, 1D must organize the staggering and rotation of different departments’ work. This is something that should have been identified during the tech scout, so a plan should already have been discussed for this in advance of the production day.
  • COVID: Camera placement should be more than six feet away from any actor. Any exceptions to this need to have been approved during Director’s Prep.
  • COVID: Set up video village in a location to minimize crowding around the monitor. Only two, physically distancing crew members may be at video village at one time, with priority given to DR and SS.
  • COVID: SM gives a sanitized wireless lav to each actor and instructs them how to secure the mic. If necessary, SM may secure the mic themselves, but the physical proximity should be kept to a minimum duration and an extra level of protection should be considered, such as a face-shield or a plexiglass divider.
Are we ready for camera rehearsal?

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Camera Rehearsal

Camera rehearsal is up. Stand by.
  • 2D asks DR if they wish to be present. DR either comes to set or 2D informs 1D to proceed without DR. (If DR does not come to set, 1D calls “action” and “cut” instead.)
  • COVID: Do not use actors for the camera rehearsal, and keep minimal crew on set.
Camera ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
We are going for camera rehearsal...
  • Action is called. Technical team runs shot.
...That's a cut on camera rehearsal
How was that for camera?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
How was that for sound?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

BAD FOR EITHER
Troubleshoot

GOOD FOR BOTH
Proceed

Camera ready for rehearsal?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready for rehearsal?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Rehearsal

Essential personnel only, please.
  • COVID: The set is about to become a Zone A space, so 1D clears the set of all non-essential personnel.
First Team in, please
  • 2D brings DR and actors to set. Everything must be ready!
Everyone work quietly. First team is on set.
  • DR works with actors. (Note: Rehearsal moves directly into shooting. If any technical issue arise that cannot be solved immediately, 1D releases First Team until it is solved.)
  • COVID: Actors should ideally remain in masks during rehearsals. If masks need to be removed for any reason, consider deploying other protections, such as plexiglass barriers.
Rehearsal is up. Stand by.
  • 1D waits and confirms visually when DR is ready.
Quiet, please. We are going for rehearsal...
  • DR calls “action” and “cut.” This should be treated like it is a take by all set personnel. Make sure the set is locked up.
...That's a cut on rehearsal. Stand by.
  • While DR checks in with the actors, 1D checks in with camera and sound for feedback. 1D relays this information to DR, who chooses to rehearse again or proceed.
Are we ready to shoot?

NO
Call: “We are going again.
Stand by.”

YES
Proceed

Last Looks

Picture is up. Last looks.
Camera ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Sound ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.
Director ready?
  • Check, or confirm by non-verbal eye contact.

NO
Troubleshoot

YES
Proceed

Going for picture

We are going for picture. Lock it up.
  • It’s GO time. Listen to ensure set is locked up. Be very sure EVERYONE is actually ready, especially DR and actors, before calling:
  • COVID: Slating should be at least six feet from any actors. If the lens or space does not allow for that, a pan over to the slate should be used instead.
  • COVID: Actors should remove their own masks. If the shot doesn’t permit them to keep the mask on their person, PD should provide a Ziploc bag with the actor’s name on it and PD should manage the Ziploc bags during takes.
  • COVID: If hair and makeup needs to make an adjustment due to the masks, this should occur swiftly.
  • COVID: If DR wants to go again quickly, and actors consent, masks can stay off between takes.
Roll sound...
  • If sound is being recorded on a dedicated field recorder, use Cadence for Dual-System Sound.
  • If sound is being recorded by the camera, use Cadence for Single-System Sound.
Cadence for dual-system sound

  • SM calls SPEED
  • 2C VOICE SLATES
  • 1C rolls camera and Camera Operator calls SPEED
  • 2C calls MARKER and clacks the sticks
  • Camera Operator calls FRAME
  • 1D calls MASKS OFF (actors remove masks)
  • DR calls ACTION, watches take, and calls CUT
  • 1D calls MASKS ON (actors replace masks)

Cadence for single-system sound

  • 1C rolls camera and Camera Operator calls SPEED
  • 2C VOICE SLATES
  • 2C calls MARKER and clacks the sticks
  • Camera Operator calls FRAME
  • 1D calls MASKS OFF (actors remove masks)
  • DR calls ACTION, watches take, and calls CUT
  • 1D calls MASKS ON (actors replace masks)

That's a cut on picture. Stand by.
  • 1D checks in with camera and sound to see if the take was good or if a technical issue may require another take.
  • 1D relays this information to DR, and checks to see if the DR would like to go again or move on to the next set-up.
Ready to move on?

NO
Repeat

YES
Proceed

Moving on

Thank you, First Team
  • 2D escorts the actors (and DR if desired) off set and the crew comes in to execute the next set-up.
  • COVID: After the First Team has left the set, 1D allows crew to re-enter the space.
We are moving on to... (describe next set-up)
  • Move on to the next planned set-up as indicated previously during the New Deal. 1D restates shot as previously described.
  • Return to BUILDING IT and proceed until all scene coverage is complete.
  • When the scene is complete, return to WORKING OUT THE BLOCKING for next scene.
  • Continue this process for the rest of the day.
  • During the day, if the production falls behind schedule or if any problems arise, 1D should be proactive in conferring privately with DR and/or DP on how to solve the problems. This can be done quietly and discreetly on set or during breaks, such as lunch.
  • COVID: Departments should sanitize equipment throughout the day during free moments, especially anything to be handled by others in the department.

Important Time-Based Items

Start of Day

First shot is off at (state time)
  • Recording the time of the first shot of the day (and the first shot after lunch) is an important item that is reported to the studio on the DPR.

Midday

That's lunch
  • At exactly the 6-hour mark after first call time Lunch must be called. If the team has already rolled on a set-up you can go into “Grace,” which means work must then be completed within 12 minutes. You cannot shoot past this or you are in meal penalty.
  • During lunch, 1D talks to DR and the DP about the rest of the day’s work and participates in making any adjustments to the plan and/or schedule to help make the day.
  • COVID: Boxed lunches should be delivered to the team spaces for each department, so as to avoid having people congregating around a single lunch table.
  • COVID: Since masks need to be off for eating, extra precaution must be taken. Eating outside with maximum distance between people is recommended.
  • COVID: Staggering the start time for lunch for different departments is recommended, if the schedule permits. Staggering the start time for lunch is required if physical distancing is not possible at the location.
Ten Minutes
  • Ten minutes before the end of lunch the 1st AD announces this to everyone.
We're back
  • This call marks the official end of lunch. All crew is required to return to work. 1D should remind everyone what set-up is first up after lunch.
  • COVID: After lunch, PR makes sure that high-touch surfaces get a sanitizing wipe down and each department sanitizes heavily used items of equipment.

End of Day

This is the Abby Singer
  • 1D alerts the crew that this is the second-to-last set up. (Be sure it actually is before announcing.) This is a morale boost as the day nears its end.
This is the martini
  • 1D alerts the crew that this is the last set up of the day. (BE SURE it actually is before announcing.) This is a bigger morale boost as the day nears its end.
That's a day (and/or picture) wrap for
(actor's name)
  • Crew applauds to thank the talent for the day’s work or for their work over multiple days on the whole picture.
That's a day (and/or picture) wrap for
(production name)
  • Crew celebrates a hard day’s work. “Picture Wrap” can be an emotional call after weeks of work on a feature.
Company Wrap
  • 1D talks to the DR and the DP about the next day’s work and any adjustments to the plan and/or schedule.
  • 1D signs off on the Daily Production Report (DPR), which is sent back to production by the 2D.
  • COVID: 1D makes sure that camera wrap happens no less than 60 minutes before company wrap, to allow sufficient time for loading out and cleaning the location.
  • COVID: Actors change out of wardrobe, preferably in a single-person occupancy changing room. PD places any wardrobe supplied by the production in a secure bag to be laundered if used again. If actors need to remove their masks, the changing room becomes a Zone A space.
  • COVID: Equipment should be reloaded back into the truck in a prescribed sequence. Only one crew member is permitted in the back of the truck at a time. Physical distancing must be observed at all times. Each department should clean equipment during wrap.
  • COVID: Doors Down Meeting should ideally be performed outside. If the space does not permit all crew to congregate with adequate physical distancing, the crew may divide up into departmental groups for separate, smaller doors down meetings.
  • COVID: 2D keeps access to location restricted until last crew member has left. The plan for sanitizing the location at company wrap must be completed before the 2D leaves the location.

Walkaway Wraps

A “walkaway wrap” is when equipment remains at a shooting location overnight.

The standard operating procedure for location shoots is for all school equipment to be packed up and removed from the shooting location at the end of each day. This is for a number of reasons: to protect the equipment from theft and damage; to protect location owners, and our relationship with location owners, by returning their space to normalcy at the end of each shooting day; and to protect the educational experience of the below-the-line crew, so that they have the opportunity to practice wrapping equipment safely and efficiently at the end of each shooting day.

On thesis productions only, students may request a walkaway wrap, but permission will only be granted in exceptional circumstances. Approval is at the discretion of the Director’s Prep Faculty and the Head of Set Operations, and the following conditions must be met:

  1. Requests must be made prior to the start of the show’s first day of production.
  2. Walkaway wraps may not be requested for family homes or other residential locations.
  3. Production must resume the day following the walkaway wrap. There cannot be any days off between the walkaway wrap and resuming of production.
  4. All department heads on the crew must approve the plan for the walkaway wrap.
  5. The Producer must provide a detailed description of which pieces of equipment would remain at the location and the reasons for why a walkaway wrap is being requested. Approval will only be given for rigging, where the extensiveness of the tear-down is a major factor.
  6. The Producer must provide a detailed plan for how the equipment will be secured safely at the location, to prevent theft/damage and to prevent injury to anyone who may enter the location before the crew returns.
  7. The Producer must provide a security professional to sit with the equipment overnight. The Head of Set Operations will determine whether or not a specific individual is approved for this task.